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Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Paddy’s Girl at Paddy Rice: Dessert or Cocktail?

Paddy’s Girl at Paddy Rice: Dessert or Cocktail?

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It looks like tiramisu dessert in a martini glass. This double-layered drink in a chocolate-rimmed glass carries a sweet scent of chocolate-coffee beans.

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Paddy’s Girl, a traditional Irish cocktail, can be found in the espresso-rigged clutches of mainly female patrons at the Irish sports bar on the Riverside.

“It gives you a real kick,” says Paddy Rice manager Susi Phipps. “If you get drunk on it, it doesn’t make you tired and lazy.”

Patrons could often been spotted awake and donning chocolate smiles from the laced glass at 1am, according to Phipps.  

The blend softens the harshness of the espresso, which makes the first layer, with sweetness from the cream and chocolate, which sits smoothly on the top.

“It’s like a dessert, like a chocolate coffee cake which has a richness that is not too sweet.”

The cocktail is not chilled, rather it sits comfortably a couple notches cooler than room temperature – this is achieved by crushing ice cubes in a blender with the hot coffee shot.

Bar supervisor Reap Sovann says people were not thrown off the Paddy’s Girl by the Cambodian heat.

“Once they start, they usually have a few more. The girls don’t normally stop after one,” he says.

“Our foreign customers prefer it more than our Cambodian customers, though a few Khmer women who know what it is like it.

A lot of our foreign customers can’t even believe there is an Irish pub in Cambodia, let alone a Paddy’s Girl drink.”

Cost: US$4.50. Happy hour 4 to 8pm, buy one get one free.

Ingredients: Irish whiskey, Irish cream, chocolate liqueur, espresso, ice.

Address: Paddy Rice, # 213 Cnr Sisowath Quay and St 136.

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