Search

Search form

Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Bribes often cost of doing business: survey

Bribes often cost of doing business: survey

Bribes often cost of doing business: survey

More than half of businesses operating in Cambodia have paid a bribe, a recent survey by the Cambodian Federation of Employers and Business Associations (CAMFEBA) suggests.

The survey is part of CAMFEBA’s Pathways to Prosperity report, which makes several recommendations to improve Cambodia’s business environment. Among the suggestions are offering skills training, passing a new trade union law and reducing bureaucratic hurdles.

CAMFEBA found that 58 per cent of the 300 businesses interviewed had never refused to pay a bribe, while a third of firms took no action when encountering “corrupt and unethical practices in the regulatory and legal environment”.

The responses came from across industries, including ICT, agro-processing and the garment sector.

And for those that did not line the pockets of government officials, the wheels stopped turning. Seventy per cent reported receiving a delay in service after refusing to pay a bribe.

Cambodia’s Anti-Corruption Unit has had little impact, CAMFEBA says, due to fears from both public and private sectors about the disclosure of corruption.

“CAMFEBA recognizes the role of the private sector in improving governance, but recognizes the risk to individuals of taking action in the absence of legal protections for whistleblowers.”

The group will discuss the report in more detail today in connection with findings by the International Labour Organization.

Several representatives of CAMFEBA did not return calls or emails seeking comment yesterday.

Phay Siphan, spokesman for the Council of Ministers, said tackling the issue cuts both ways and that the private sector should help.

“The government corruption doesn’t help, but the people who make the government corrupted don’t help.”

RECOMMENDED STORIES

  • Breaking: PM says prominent human rights NGO ‘must close’

    Prime Minister Hun Sen has instructed the Interior Ministry to investigate the Cambodian Center for Human Rights (CCHR) and potentially close it “because they follow foreigners”, appearing to link the rights group to the opposition Cambodia National Rescue Party's purported “revolution”. The CNRP - the

  • Rainsy and Sokha ‘would already be dead’: PM

    Prime Minister Hun Sen on Sunday appeared to suggest he would have assassinated opposition leaders Sam Rainsy and Kem Sokha had he known they were promising to “organise a new government” in the aftermath of the disputed 2013 national elections. In a clip from his speech

  • Massive ceremony at Angkor Wat will show ‘Cambodia not in anarchy’: PM

    Government officials, thousands of monks and Prime Minister Hun Sen himself will hold a massive prayer ceremony at Angkor Wat in early December to highlight the Kingdom’s continuing “peace, independence and political stability”, a spectacle observers said was designed to disguise the deterioration of

  • PM tells workers CNRP is to blame for any sanctions

    In a speech to workers yesterday, Prime Minister Hun Sen pinned the blame for any damage inflicted on Cambodia’s garment industry by potential economic sanctions squarely on the opposition party. “You must remember clearly that if the purchase orders are reduced, it is all