Search

Search form

Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Chruoy Changvar to limit festival vendors

Chruoy Changvar to limit festival vendors

Chruoy Changvar to limit festival vendors

13-story-2.jpg
13-story-2.jpg

Photo by: Heng Chivoan

Rowers on the Tonle Bassac at last year’s water festival in Phnom Penh.

RUSSEY Keo district Governor Khlaing Huot said that, unlike  in previous years, authorities in Chruoy Changvar commune will not be permitted to lease privately-owned sections of the peninsula to vendors during the boat races on the Tonle Sap, one of the Water Festival's highlights.

"It won't impact those people just because we won't allow them to sell things during the festival. The celebration is to entertain people, it serves culture - not business," Khlaing Huot said.

He added that authorities plan to ask the hotel owners to remove fences blocking views of the boat races.

A development project by the Sokha Hotel is  blocking off a 14-hectare riverside plot.

"We will ask them to replace their metal fences with nets because we want viewers to be able to see the whole ceremony," Khlaing Huot said.

A manager at the Sokha Hotel Group, who did not want to be named, told the Post that he has not yet received any information about preparations for the Water Festival, which runs from November 11 to 13, but said the company will not pull out fences surrounding its land in Chruoy Changvar for fear that construction materials could be stolen.

"We cannot pull out our fences since we are building now, and we are scared we will lose our construction materials," the manager said.

He added that the construction site will not obstruct views of the boat races because a strip of land will be available on the riverbank outside the site.

Pich Sareoun, Chruoy Changvar commune chief, said the area sees the arrival of thousands of provincial visitors for the three-day Water Festival, many of whom come to sell food, drinks and fruit to revellers.

In the past, he said, the authorities only maintained safety during the ceremony. "The villagers here always earn money by selling some food, drink, rice or fruits ... [but] they will not be able to make profit anymore, since the area is surrounded with fencing," he said.

"So far, we have received no information from the municipality ordering us to prepare the zone. In the past, the municipality and the company always negotiated with each other about the zone, and now we are just awaiting information from the municipality," Pich Sareoun said.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

  • Rainsy and Sokha ‘would already be dead’: PM

    Prime Minister Hun Sen on Sunday appeared to suggest he would have assassinated opposition leaders Sam Rainsy and Kem Sokha had he known they were promising to “organise a new government” in the aftermath of the disputed 2013 national elections. In a clip from his speech

  • Massive ceremony at Angkor Wat will show ‘Cambodia not in anarchy’: PM

    Government officials, thousands of monks and Prime Minister Hun Sen himself will hold a massive prayer ceremony at Angkor Wat in early December to highlight the Kingdom’s continuing “peace, independence and political stability”, a spectacle observers said was designed to disguise the deterioration of

  • PM tells workers CNRP is to blame for any sanctions

    In a speech to workers yesterday, Prime Minister Hun Sen pinned the blame for any damage inflicted on Cambodia’s garment industry by potential economic sanctions squarely on the opposition party. “You must remember clearly that if the purchase orders are reduced, it is all

  • Ex-RFA journos accuse outlet

    Two former Radio Free Asia journalists held a press conference yesterday claiming they are each owed $28,000 by the US-funded radio broadcaster, which shuttered its in-country operations in September amid a government crackdown on independent media. The journalists, Sok Ratha and Ouk Savborey, maintained they organised