Subscribe Search

Search form

Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Garlic leaves are a boon for farmer

Garlic leaves are a boon for farmer

Garlic farmer Pring Leang, 49, waters crops on his farm in Kandal province’s Saang district.
Garlic farmer Pring Leang, 49, waters crops on his farm in Kandal province’s Saang district. RANN REUY

Garlic leaves are a boon for farmer

Profitable income generation has many sources. Whether it requires work in an office, trading on the market or farming land – the outcome always depends on the innovation and effort of the individual.

For Pring Leang, the sources are three small fields in Kampong Por village in Kraingyov commune of Saang district, about 40 kilometres south of Phnom Penh. Here, on a total of half a hectare of land, the 49-year-old plants garlic to sell its leaves. ‘

This, he says, brings him $5,000 per year.

“I have never feared loss of income because we have been professionally working for nearly 30 years,” he said.

The time between planting the seeds and harvesting the leaves is about 40 days, a process Leang performs three times in a given year.

“This work is not tiring because I can rest whenever I prefer,” he said.

The garlic leaf price has been volatile, going up and down depending on the number of farmers planting. However, he says he has never sees losses because his fields are well preserved and he always reserves seeds from the current crop for planting later, to avoid the necessity of spending more money by purchasing them from traders.

“It is cheap when more garlic leaf farmers plant simultaneously during harvesting time,” Leang said.

On Saturday, a day before the national election, garlic leaves were sold for 3,500 riel per kilogram, jumping from 2,500 riel two weeks ago. Leang says at a price of 3,500 riel he can make about 1 million riel ($250) from leaves planted on 0.10 hectares – one of the three small fields.

Two years ago, the price decreased to a level as low as 800 riel a kilogram, and profits were so low that some people quit planting.

Although making a small loss, Leang continued on the reserve seeds he had saved up.

He says that recently, prices have been good and during the rainy season in October, November and December, they climbed up to 10,000 riel a kilogram.

Besides selling to middlemen trading on markets in Phnom Penh, Leang also hawks seeds to farmers in his village or neighbouring villages.

While damage on the fields does occur, Leang said the worst scenario would be a maximum 30 per cent loss of the his total output for a round of planting.

Of his three children, two are married and followed his career as a garlic farmer, while his youngest daughter is in her third year as a student at a university in Phnom Penh.

“I have spent much money for my daughter studying,” he says. “If my daughter didn’t study, the money I owned today would be pretty good.”

RECOMMENDED STORIES

  • Thy Sovantha threatens new suit

    Social media celebrity and card-carrying CPP member Thy Sovantha yesterday said she will file a lawsuit against wildlife NGO head Suwanna Gauntlett alleging discrimination after the latter allegedly denied her access to an ecotourism program the group is launching today in Koh Kong province. The

  • Police raid Siem Reap party, arrest 10 foreigners over ‘pornographic’ images

    A group of 10 foreign tourists appeared in court today after being arrested for producing “pornographic” photos in Siem Reap town on Thursday, while dozens more were detained temporarily and let go after being lectured on their behaviour, according to authorities. A report posted to the

  • Hun Sen’s in-law removed from RCAF after cockfighting rings raided

    Thai Phany, the nephew-in-law of Prime Minister Hun Sen who is accused of running two large cockfighting rings, has been removed as a general in the Royal Cambodian Armed Forces. Phany, formerly a one-star brigadier general, was removed by royal decree on December 19, according to

  • Government approves plan to relocate Phnom Penh’s airport

    The government has signed off on a proposal to build a new airport to serve Phnom Penh and has earmarked land in Kandal province for the $1.5 billion project. A new international airport to replace the existing Phnom Penh International Airport will be constructed on partially