Search form

Login - Register | FOLLOW US ON

Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - CRF calls to tighten code of conduct

CRF calls to tighten code of conduct

The Cambodian Rice Federation has pushed for the full implementation of a code of conduct which bars Cambodian firms from exporting cheap rice from neighbouring countries under its own name.

The code of conduct sought to reassure the European Union that Cambodia was not flouting the Everything But Arms agreement, under which the Kingdom exports goods duty-free due to its status as a low-income country.

But some rice exporters say the code of conduct, which was signed in February 2014, has not been followed as stringently as was originally intentioned.

“For me, the code is good, but the implementation is not that effective,” said Khan Kuthy, general manager of newly-established rice miller Brico.

“As far as I know, no one has been punished.”

A statement from the CRF said a “laissez-faire” environment and consequent lack of investigation has led to price declines and blows to the rice’s international reputation.

Although it remains to be determined which procedures will be established to tackle the problem, David Van, senior advisor to the CRF, urged the creation of a disciplinary committee to investigate potential flouting of the code.

“When you look at the market, some people have been selling way, way below the price, and you have to wonder where the heck the rice is coming from,” he said.

Under the code of conduct, existing penalties include revoking an exporter’s certification of origin, effectively barring it from exporting.

But finding the culprits may not be so easy, said Sok David, vice president of Golden Rice Cambodia.

“It’s hard to prove - the price [also] depends on productivity, on the raw material, on the factory,” he said.

“There is a mechanism . . . but you have to find fault,” he added.

Meanwhile, the CRF agreed in February to levy a $1 fee per metric tonne of fragrant rice and $0.50 per metric tonne of long grain white rice for the CRF’s yearly budget.

The new fees, which came in to force on March 1, is to be spent on CRF operations, educating farmers, and promoting Cambodian rice abroad.

0

Comments

Please, login or register to post a comment

Latest Video

Cambodia's last tile masters: Why a local craft is under threat

Brought over by the French, painted cement tile making has been incorporated into Cambodian design for more than a century, even as the industry has died out in Europe.

Interview: Loung Ung, author of First They Killed My Father

The story of Loung Ung and her family’s suffering under the Khmer Rouge became known around the world with the success of her autobiographical book, First They Killed My Father.

Setting up a drone for flight. Photo supplied

How Cambodia's first drone company is helping farmers

SM Waypoint claims its unmanned aerial vehicles can help local farm and plantation owners increase their yields.