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Co-producer Rithy Panh (left), translator Phichith Rithea and Angelina Jolie Pitt. Courtesy of Pax Jolie Pitt
Co-producer Rithy Panh (left), translator Phichith Rithea and Angelina Jolie Pitt. Courtesy of Pax Jolie Pitt

Jolie’s film set for Siem Reap debut

The world premiere of Angelina Jolie’s highly anticipated film First They Killed my Father is set for February 18 in Siem Reap, seven months before its release on Netflix.

The Jolie-directed and produced film was shot partly in Battambang and partly in Siem Reap last year.

It is a cinema adaptation of Loung Ung’s Khmer Rouge memoir First They Killed My Father and is being produced for Netflix. A worldwide release date for the online platform has not yet been set but is scheduled for this year.

The memoir details the Khmer Rouge’s violent and bloody takeover of the country and Ung’s experience surviving the regime.

Ung is being played by Sareum Srey Moch, while her parents are being played by Phoeung Kompheak and Sveng Socheata. Some 500 Cambodians were employed in the production of the film.

Jolie has directed two other films, including In the Land of Blood and Honey and the 2014 Oscar-nominated World War II drama Unbroken.

This article has been updated to reflect current events.
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