Search form

Login - Register | FOLLOW US ON

Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Car sickness is not a disease

Car sickness is not a disease

Why are people allergic to the taxi? They do not eat it. Since the symptoms are similar to food sickness, some call it a poison.

Dr. Chum Navuth, Director of Internist and Neurologist at the Cambodian-Russian Friendship Hospital, explained it is not an illness because there is no research or study to prove that is actually a sickness.

“It is caused by the reagent of body and brain. They cannot recognise each other. It is a kind of mental problem caused by environmental poison.”

It usually happens to unhealthy people who fear travelling or who lose the chemical equilibrium in the body. They sometimes see the illusion of tree movement.

Vomiting, headaches, perspiring, exhaustion, and dizziness are the symptoms of car sickness. There are no cases of people dying from this problem, but that does not mean that it has no ability to kill people.

Navuth said that people with car sickness should take medicine, which they can buy at a pharmacy, 30 minutes before getting into a vehicle. Since it is caused by a loss of chemical equilibrium in the body, the passengers should sleep on the road and avoid looking at the car mirror.

He added that full cars tend to make people more sick, so the driver should open the windows and not make too much noise. However, singing karaoke can help people ignore the symptoms.

People think that having a full stomach leads to carsickness, but Navuth disagreed. He said that eating before leaving gives the passengers more energy. If they vomit, at least they can save energy in their bodies.

Lastly, he recommended that people who tend to get sick in cars should learn how to drive. When they drive themselves, the sickness goes away.

0

Comments

Please, login or register to post a comment

Latest Video

Phnom Penh eats: Homegrown veggies at Bayon Beoung Snor

​Nestled along National Road 1, Bayon Beoung Snor is a farm-cum-restaurant. The team grows their own vegetables, which they then use to whip up traditional Khmer food.

Bill Clough reflects on The Phnom Penh Post's 25 year history

The Post's publisher Bill Clough, under whose leadership the publication went from a fortnightly to a daily one, discusses his investment in Cambodia, his vision for the paper in an increasingly digital age,

People search for their names on the voter lists at a polling station in Kampong Cham’s Veal Vong commune earlier this month.

Four years ago, when the opposition snatched Kampong Cham away from the ruling party in 2013 national elections, it hinted at a deeper shift taking

Comfrel Executive Director Koul Panha speaks to the press at a meeting yesterday in Phnom Penh.

As the National Election Committee launched into the recount proc