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How to match your career to your skills

How to match your career to your skills

Vong Demorng, 24, is a fresh, new graduate student from University of Cambodia, majoring in political science. After completing her dachelor’s degree, Demorng started working as a project coordinator for an organisation. However, she doesn’t feel she is able to apply her skills in her current job.

Content image - Phnom Penh Post

“Political science is more about the leadership while project coordinating is work dealing with management,” said Demorng. “I don’t think my current job suits my academic background and it might only use 50 per cent of my skills, such as English language, computer and analysis.”

While Demorng has a lot of volunteer work experiences related to project planning and her abilities fulfil the job requirements. For instance, during her academic life, she was a member of the student senate, and she has conducted many projects to help her University and community. Demorng was also a volunteer at Transparency International Cambodia and her task was to run a workshop with her team members.

However, she said she wanted to become a policy maker or become a government officer – jobs more related to her skill set. Demorng added that she has trouble finding such job opportunities and most of the time, they require a master’s degree.

“The government should provide opportunities with transparency, accountability and equality to students who want to work in the government,” Demorng suggested.

Demorng wants to know how students who graduate with a bachelor’s degree in political science can get a job they like and utilise their skills? She also wonders why some development institutions do not provide internship programs for students and announce them publicly?

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