Search

Search form

How to write a convincing application letter

Seng Pyseth​ (centre) at a scholarship conference.  PHOTO SUPPLIED
Seng Pyseth​ (centre) at a scholarship conference. PHOTO SUPPLIED

How to write a convincing application letter

Writing a curriculum vitae and application form are only part of a good application. You also need a convincing motivation letter and personal statement. Seng Pyseth, the author of the book Win Scholarships Abroad, gives Lift some useful tips.

“When the committees read the motivation letter or personal statement, they expect to see something rare, unique and different,” says Pyseth, adding this is what the committees want from the applicants. “If what we write is unique, then it is interesting.

If you want your personal statement or motivation letter to be considered, you have to have meaningful writing.”

He explained the writing needs to show logic and clear reasoning, and applicants need to realise that the committees will be judging how the applicants portray all aspects of their life, study and experiences.

“One more important point is whether their future goal fits with what they want to study . . . especially, the committees want to know what the applicants will do to contribute to their country after they get the scholarship,” said Pyseth.

Pyseth said in order to write the letter well, the students or the applicants should (1) know yourself well, (2) know the reason for applying for the scholarship, (3) don’t make false claims or brag too much, (4) don’t procrastinate and wait to write it just before the deadline, (5) don’t plagiarise, and (6) write and re-edit until you’re completely satisfied.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

  • Breaking: PM says prominent human rights NGO ‘must close’

    Prime Minister Hun Sen has instructed the Interior Ministry to investigate the Cambodian Center for Human Rights (CCHR) and potentially close it “because they follow foreigners”, appearing to link the rights group to the opposition Cambodia National Rescue Party's purported “revolution”. The CNRP - the

  • Rainsy and Sokha ‘would already be dead’: PM

    Prime Minister Hun Sen on Sunday appeared to suggest he would have assassinated opposition leaders Sam Rainsy and Kem Sokha had he known they were promising to “organise a new government” in the aftermath of the disputed 2013 national elections. In a clip from his speech

  • Massive ceremony at Angkor Wat will show ‘Cambodia not in anarchy’: PM

    Government officials, thousands of monks and Prime Minister Hun Sen himself will hold a massive prayer ceremony at Angkor Wat in early December to highlight the Kingdom’s continuing “peace, independence and political stability”, a spectacle observers said was designed to disguise the deterioration of

  • PM tells workers CNRP is to blame for any sanctions

    In a speech to workers yesterday, Prime Minister Hun Sen pinned the blame for any damage inflicted on Cambodia’s garment industry by potential economic sanctions squarely on the opposition party. “You must remember clearly that if the purchase orders are reduced, it is all