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Is it really necessary to drive on the pavement?

Is it really necessary to drive on the pavement?

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Traffic jam in Phnom Penh. Photograph: Phnom Penh Post

Ten years ago, traffic jams rarely occurred, and only on special occasions like special ceremonies. Nowadays traffic jams have become the norm. There are too many drivers on the roads, and many of them ignore the law.

Motorbike riders often drive on the pavements, even though those are destined to pedestrians.

Why do they do that?

The answer must be because instead of being stuck in a traffic jam they want to move fast.

But if you were a pedestrian or a person living along the most trafficked streets in the city, how would you feel?

Teb Marady, a house owner living on Mao Tse Tong Blvd, near Derm Kor traffic light, said: “Not only me, but also my neighbours are not happy. It not only affects our dignity, but it worries me about my safety because these people ride their vehicles right next to me. Sometimes it’s not only motorbikes but also car drivers who drive over my pavement.”

Until now he witnessed three accidents on the pavement of his house, caused by fast driving.

Sometimes drivers also curse at people to force them to move away from the pavement, Marady added. “Both motorbike and car drivers should avoid travelling on the pavement. They should obey the law instead."

No country can get rid of traffic jams, but what is important is that people learn to obey the law, act in a moral way and understand other people to avoid problems and accidents when driving.

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