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Khmer arts

KHMER dance, music, paintings and sculpture are a heritage from  ancient times, and Cambodia’s young generation needs to learn about them so they will be preserved.

This heritage draws a lot of international tourists to this country. Apsara dancing, Chunpor and other Khmer dancing, and the visual arts are among the things that have caught their attention. Some Cambodian young people, however, don’t seem to be interested in these traditional arts (3-4).

Sculpture is one area of the arts that needs to develop and preserve its own culture.

But because it is almost absent from the school curriculum and is not a big source of  jobs, a lot of teenagers aren’t interested in studying it, and it faces an uncertain future  (6-7).

This week, we find a young man who has talent and who loves Khmer culture. He began his dancing career at the age of six, and now he has become an assistant teacher of traditional dance (9).

Nevertherless, there is also a girl who has interested in the career of Khmer art dancing. She shared her working experience with others who are interested in this subject (10).

Last week, a former Toul Sleng prisoner who was also an artist passed away. In keeping with this week’s Lift theme, we bring teenagers together to discuss this issue (8).

Lift has even more interesting articles inside. If you would like to offer answers for the weekly prize, please send them to us. If you have further comments, also send them to us via lift@phnompenhpost.com. Thank you!

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