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The new business trend and the effects on Khmer culture

The new business trend and the effects on Khmer culture

Meas Rous, an associate recruitment consultant and client manager at Human Resources Inc Cambodia, gives some suggestions to Chea Sopheak on how to run a matchmaker service.

“First, she should do research on matchmaking,” said Meas Rous, “If there is a real need, then she can plan an event to get her services known. In order to do so, she should have business partners.”

He explained that to make an event happen she should find a good venue and seat potential clients according to age to avoid awkwardness.

“It is important to keep good communication with business partners who can share the information with others and create new events,” he added.

A matchmaker service could be seen as contrary to Khmer culture because parents are the ones who typically arrange marriages for their children. So, does the service affect the culture?

Thai Naraksatya, secretary of state of the Ministry of Culture and Fine Arts, said, “It is a new service I haven’t seen here before. I’ve only seen it in foreign movies. However, it might minimally affect Khmer culture.”

“It is a new idea to people, which we call a ‘New Creation’. When society moves towards the development, thoughts and feelings also change. Others think they can copy this service in another country and culture,” he added. “I think it affects the culture but at the same time, I do not think that it violates human rights or puts anyone at a serious disadvantage.”

He explained that the service might be successful and it might not. Depending on the preferences and beliefs of the youth; if there is support, the service could survive, but without support, the service could fail.

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