Search form

Login - Register | FOLLOW US ON

Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Is outdoor exercise risky?

Is outdoor exercise risky?

130102 03
People exercising near 7 Makara bridge. Photograph: Banung Ou/Phnom Penh Post

Exercise can improve your health and help reduce the risk of illness. However, is exercising in polluted areas good for health?

“I do exercises twice a day, in the morning and in the evening,” says Pen Sophal, a governmental officer who runs every day at Kdan Pi park.

“I choose this park to do exercises since it is near my house and I don’t need to spend any money. On top of that, I can start and finish whenever I want.

However, it is not always fun, since sometimes I get sick or catch a cold. Maybe I exercise too much or do it wrongly. I am actually not sure,” Sophal says.

Is physical exercises in polluted areas a risk for health?

“I am not going to exercise in crowed place along the road since I am worried about safety,” says Ly Kim Eng, a second-year student in Khmer literature at the Royal University of Phnom Penh.

“An accident can happen. Also, as a Khmer girl, I don’t think running around in public is the thing to do. Moreover, outdoors exercises are not good for health since it is dirty and dusty.”

Dr. Prak Piseth Raingsy, director of the Heath Protection department at the Ministry of Health, says “Inhaling smog really affects people even if they do not do any exercises outside.

“Vehicles fumes contain chemicals detrimental to health and may affect lungs." Raingsy says.

“We, human being, should do exercise in a place where there is no pollution since it is good for health.

“However, if you cannot avoid doing exercise in crowded places, I suggest you do it in the early morning hours because roads are less crowded with low levels of pollution unlike in the evening when roads are jammed,” says Raingsy.

0

Comments

Please, login or register to post a comment

Latest Video

Khmer Rouge survivors react to First They Killed My Father

Angelina Jolie's First They Killed My Father depicts some of the atrocities committed during the Pol Pot regime, including mass killings, forced labour and the conscription of children as soldiers.

Cambodia's last tile masters: Why a local craft is under threat

Brought over by the French, painted cement tile making has been incorporated into Cambodian design for more than a century, even as the industry has died out in Europe.

Interview: Loung Ung, author of First They Killed My Father

The story of Loung Ung and her family’s suffering under the Khmer Rouge became known around the world with the success of her autobiographical book, First They Killed My Father.