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Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Walking in an logistics operator’s shoes

Walking in an logistics operator’s shoes

logistic

What would you do if you want to send stuff somewhere? You would probably call someone else to do it for you, and that person might just be Chea Sokleap, who works as a logistics expert at the Delano office building in Cambodian’s capital city?

As the world becomes more interconnected and goods and services need to move both only from one city to the next, but often from one continent to the next, the importance of people who make sure it gets there is more important than ever. .

Before going to spend some time with Chea Sokleap at the office of her company Hellmann in the modern business space, I imagined that she was responsible for stocking planes and ships with a seemingly limitless capacity, I found out what logistics operators really do.

“We are a kind of seller but our job is different from a typical salesman who deals directly with the customer, she said. “We sell service that is invisible.”

As an operations executive in the international logistics company, she described her duties to me. “Doing a logistics job is similar to conducting a project; we are required to coordinate things step by step.”

As technology and telecommunication have developed remarkably in recent years, logistics operators work mostly on their computers rather than going out to meet people in person.

In my time with her, Sokleap barely had time to talk with me since she had so many orders to clear and mail to confirm with her clients that orders were going ahead as planned.

Although she says her clients never stop worrying about their deliveries location or progress, she is not always as busy as she was on the day I visited. Logistics runs on a two season schedule, high season and low season, and now it is high. The greatest challenges to her job are natural disasters or unexpected changes such as the rise in fuel prices recently. And, even with technology, it seems like processing and publishing orders can never be done fast enough for her clients.

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