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Welcome to LIFT issue 6

Welcome to LIFT issue 6

Language is a crucial instrument in facilitating global connectivity. In Cambodia, many younger generations are extending their horizons by learning and speaking a variety of foreign languages. English is the most common foreign language, however Japanese, Chinese, Korean and French are all widely studied as well.

Language is not only giving students more opportunities in the job market, it is imperative in developing the abilities of kids and encouraging a critical and open-minded attitude towards society.

Researchers found that students who are able to communicate in more than one language not only have more employment opportunities, they are also able to adapt to new environments and have a more advanced aptitude for writing and mathematics

Students in Cambodia are the seeds of both the community and the nation, and these things will only grow within a global society if young people are equipped with bilingual speaking abilities. They will avoid becoming outdated if they can speak a language beyond their mother tongue Khmer.

Information and technology are the main drivers encouraging young people to develop their capacity beyond the boundaries of their native language. Widespread availability of cell phones and the Internet is making communication with the rest of the world ever more possible.

The benefits of being bilingual are gigantic and will make for brighter future for people in all levels of society. In Cambodia, public schools should consider providing opportunities to students to learn foreign languages at an earlier age and provide a space for practicum learning rather than just parroting their teachers. By Sophan Seng, a contributor to Lift and a Cambodian national living in Canada

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