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What challenges do you face while studying at university?

Heng Teaksor, 23, fourth-year student at National University of Management
“The pressure to get a good job can be really overwhelming. Since we have to concentrate so much on getting a good job, we often forget to put our talents and abilities into the discipline we’re studying at school. I’m always looking for a part-time job to build up my qualifications; however, this takes away from time I could be studying or doing independent research to learn more. Although I can manage my time between both, I would like to just concentrate on school while I can. This is a difficult problem that students face now.”


Un Kanha, 17, student at Hun Sen Bun Rany Wat Phnom High School
“A lot of my friends like to skip class and go out instead, and they try to convince me to join them. It definitely affects my studies, since sometimes I skip school and end up telling lies to my parents. I want to get away from these friends who are bad influences, but it’s not easy. I don’t want them to think I’m arrogant, or try to get back at me in anger if I ditch them. I don’t want to disappoint my parents, either, so I’m stuck. When it comes to studying, I fit it in during my free time. It’s easy to find a friend, but it’s very hard to find a good friend”


Kheng Sreyna, 21, third-year student at Economic and Finance Institute
“My biggest challenge is financial support, since I need daily compensation and a way to finance my studies. If my parents aren’t able to support me, then I can’t keep studying. With the way things are today, it’s all about money. And since I’m so busy with my studies, I can’t find the time to work right now. I have to pay my tuition, for my books, the uniform, gas and transportation costs – it adds up to a lot. On top of this, it’s hard to concentrate on getting good marks if I’m worried about my finances.”


Samnang Vichea, 19, second-year student at SETEC University
“If I lack encouragement and support from my family, then it really affects my studies. When they support me, I do well in school. But if I’m lacking that support, I often have trouble finding success. Sometimes, if I fail an exam, I get really disappointed. But if my parents reassure me, the next time I’ll get a good grade. They reward me, too, which keeps me going. Competition between students is good for motivation too – it keeps us ambitious and wanting to stay ahead of the curve.”


Iv Vanhout, 21, second-year student at Royal University of Law and Economics
“All the decisions I have to make while studying are difficult. It’s hard to choose a major and I doubt myself because it’s such an important decision. If I don’t choose the right one, it will affect my entire future. Also, sometimes there’s trouble with keeping up with my studies. I don’t want to have wasted all my time and money on my degree if I end up failing. All these concerns and doubts can take a toll on doing well in school.”

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