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Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - What changes have you seen in your homeland?

What changes have you seen in your homeland?

Khoun Srey Roth, 20, third-year student at Royal University of Law and Economics, from Banteay Meanchey province
“I moved to live in Phnom Penh in 2010. When I visited my homeland in Banteay Meanchey, I found it completely changed. Before there were no high buildings, and now there are businesses such as Starmark and gasoline stations. Regarding education, now there are a number of private language schools. I did notice that our main roads are not paved yet. In public parks, I saw many people gather for relaxation activities – the parks are now wider and more decorated to attract people to visit.”

Krouch Samnang, 23, third-year student at Cambodia University for Specialties, from Kandal province
“My hometown today is more developed than before. The number of roads and schools has increased and the town is cleaner. Before, there were only primary schools; now there are secondary schools. Furthermore, there are more students than before and they’ve been attending school since they were young. The health sector, however, hasn’t developed much due the fact that the number of hospitals and services are not much different than before.”

Kuy Kakda, 23, third-year student at Royal University of Law and Economics, from Kampong Cham province
“Compared to the past, my hometown is more developed. Now all the roads for travelling have been improved. That makes getting to schools and hospitals a lot more convenient. For daily life, because my hometown is full of rubber farms, most villagers are rubber farmers. Some of them are rubber-planting workers while the others are general managers. People living in my hometown today feel safer than before because security in the village is better.”

Ly Boranine, 21, graduate student at Royal University of Law and Economics, from Pursat province
“I am from Pursat province; I moved Phnom Penh for university. Whenever I visit my province, the biggest change I notice is the number of high buildings. There are now a lot of high business buildings and some new state buildings. For tourists, I know that there is a new recreation site called Koh Som Pov which has been rebuilt.”

Yeng Hokvun, 22, fourth-year student at Vanda Institute of Accounting, from Kampong Thom province
“My hometown is more developed than before. ?There are enough hospitals that can support the villagers’ demands on time. Moreover, there are also many schools near home that help young generations in the village attend school. In the past, most youths did farming, but now many continue their studies in the city and can get a suitable job in Phnom Penh depending on their skills.”



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