Search

Search form

What do you expect...

What do you expect...

Content image - Phnom Penh Post

Morn Bunnarith, 25, a graduate student from PanhaChiet University, majoring in Management, said: “It is good if it could change. The thing is that will it be able to change? As we all have known that the corruption is everywhere even in the class. Everyone used to cheat in the exams. So did I. As a result, the quality of our students is far poor comparing to other countries. If we can’t change anything by 2015 when the free market is opened for ASEAN regions, we can’t compete with others.”

Content image - Phnom Penh Post

Yim Navin, 18, a second-year-student at Cam Ed majoring in Audition, said: “If the reform actually happens, I think our education system would be better which will lead to having more human resources to develop our nation especially when the ASEAN Integration comes. If our student capacity is still disqualify, the market job for our students will be small as well. To me, I suggest that for the upcoming reforming by the new Minister of Education should focus more on experimentation materials and laboratry equipment which are needed for some majors including chemistry and architecture which need practice and experimentation. If students only learn in theory without practice, they just learn for nothing.”

Content image - Phnom Penh Post

HengSothea, 24, graduate student from National University of Management majoring in Economics, said: “It is very good to stop corruption in the education system; however, what the government should not ignore is to increase teacher’s salary starting from primary school teachers up to university lecturers. Otherwise, those teachers can’t survive. And I think with the new system, without spending money for cheating in the exams the students’ finance would also look better.”

Content image - Phnom Penh Post

Hoy Menglorng, 24, a student of PUC, said: “Our education system is still poor due to corruption as well as the low salary of teachers. These reasons result in poor quality of students’ education. Salary is very important. If the teachers don’t get paid well enough, they don’t put effort into updating their lessons since they are busy working other part-time jobs after class. If they are paid well however, they can pay more attention to teaching and updating their own knowledge for the benefit of their students. Students are like the cells in the organism of society: The better the cells, the more developed the future society will be.”

Content image - Phnom Penh Post

Pen Chenda, 21, a fourth-year-student at Vanda Institution in accounting, said: “If the corruption in exams was omitted, the qualified students would be able to pass the exam. So, once they graduated they would actually be qualified for their work afterwards. Corruption in education disappoints hard working students, especially the poor. I hope integrity will move into the education system. I also hope the government will build more schools in rural areas so countryside students can get as educated as the city students do.”

RECOMMENDED STORIES

  • Breaking: PM says prominent human rights NGO ‘must close’

    Prime Minister Hun Sen has instructed the Interior Ministry to investigate the Cambodian Center for Human Rights (CCHR) and potentially close it “because they follow foreigners”, appearing to link the rights group to the opposition Cambodia National Rescue Party's purported “revolution”. The CNRP - the

  • Rainsy and Sokha ‘would already be dead’: PM

    Prime Minister Hun Sen on Sunday appeared to suggest he would have assassinated opposition leaders Sam Rainsy and Kem Sokha had he known they were promising to “organise a new government” in the aftermath of the disputed 2013 national elections. In a clip from his speech

  • Massive ceremony at Angkor Wat will show ‘Cambodia not in anarchy’: PM

    Government officials, thousands of monks and Prime Minister Hun Sen himself will hold a massive prayer ceremony at Angkor Wat in early December to highlight the Kingdom’s continuing “peace, independence and political stability”, a spectacle observers said was designed to disguise the deterioration of

  • PM tells workers CNRP is to blame for any sanctions

    In a speech to workers yesterday, Prime Minister Hun Sen pinned the blame for any damage inflicted on Cambodia’s garment industry by potential economic sanctions squarely on the opposition party. “You must remember clearly that if the purchase orders are reduced, it is all