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Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Working in an office is not an easy job

Working in an office is not an easy job

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Sophat  Sophea pictured at work. Photograph: Phnom Penh Post

Sophat Sophea, 24, works for CellCard Company in Battambang province. He just got promoted from customer service officer to cashier.

“Working in an office all day is not, by any means, an easy job,” he says.

“Labor work and mental work are both difficult but for what we do, we have to use our brain to think more, particularly if we want to have some long-term impact. Labor work takes longer for the same outcome and it is more tiring”.  

“When workers clock out, they can sit back and relax,” he says.

“However, the situation is different for us. When things at work get tricky, it is an open invitation to problems such as stress, depression. Thinking rationally becomes tough which in consequence requires additional time to solve those new problems.”

Sophea monitors control all inbound and outbound report at the CellCard branch he works at. Although physical challenge does not really pertain to the job, at times Sophea feels exhausted and drained.  

Time management is very important.

Sophea works Monday to Saturday, from 8am to 5:30pm and has one-hour lunch break every day. Despite this prerogative, work is work and the job must be done as fast as possible.

“Sometimes, staff members want to multitask but time can be tight. I am the only one working at this managerial level. So, if I get overly busy, I can have a hard time getting any help,” he says.

Difficulties are part and parcel of his workday and Sophea likes his job: “When you like your job, you can excel at it. This job is new and I had never held such position before. But I am learning and I am getting to understand all about it.”

Sophea graduated in major management. He has now been working for two years, gaining professional experience for a better and brighter future.

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