Search form

Login - Register | FOLLOW US ON

Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Anco Bros pays out promoters

Anco Bros pays out promoters

Eight former “promotion girls” for Budweiser were compensated by the Anco Brothers Company yesterday after being laid off without any severance.

Ou Tep Phallin, an official with the Cambodian Food and Service Workers Federation (CFSWF) and the women’s representative, said yesterday that following three rounds of negotiations, Anco and the workers agreed to pay the women a total $9,730.

A copy of the agreement signed yesterday by the CFSWF and Anco confirmed the figure.

“In total, the eight will receive from $500 to $3,700, depending on their working background [with the company],” she said.

One of the promoters for the iconic American beer, Un Sotheary, confirmed yesterday that she had received her compensation.

A lawyer for Anco declined to comment on the case.

On August 5, eight of 12 fired workers protested in front of Anco’s office in Phnom Penh’s Prampi Makara district to demand severance ranging from $634 to $4,571.

The company was accused of skirting the Kingdom’s Labour Law when it fired the workers on January 27. Some of them had worked with the company for as long as 16 years.

The company is owned by tycoon Kok An, and distributes Budweiser as well as Evian water and 555 brand cigarettes.

A representative previously stated that the women were fired because the beer wasn’t selling well.

0

Comments

Please, login or register to post a comment

Latest Video

Phnom Penh eats: Ptas Nak Battambang

As the name suggests, Ptsa Nak Battambang – which in English means Battambang's house – is the right place for those who want to try some of the province's typical dishes in Phnom Penh.

Q&A with Pung Chhiv Kek, Cambodia’s first female doctor and founder of rights group Licadho

Last year, Pung Chhiv Kek was awarded the Legion d’Honneur, France’s highest decoration, for services to peace-building and human rights.

“Electric guitar is possible. Why not chapey then?”

After more than a millennium in existence, Cambodia’s traditional two-stringed chapey has finally gone electric.