Search

Search form

Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Angkor Borei: The Cradle of Cambodia?

Angkor Borei: The Cradle of Cambodia?

Angkor Borei: The Cradle of Cambodia?

AMERICAN and Cambodian archeologists have wrapped up their investigations at Angkor

Borei for the year, and have found exciting evidence to enhance the site's claim

as the cradle and a center of the oldest civilization in South-east Asia.

Evidence may also have been uncovered that will push back the earliest confirmed

dates of Khmer ethnicity.

Archeologists from Hawaii have worked side by side with Cambodian archeologists from

the Faculty of Archeology in Phnom Penh to expand investigations started last summer

in Takeo province.

The leaders of the investigation were Doctors Chuch Phoeurn, Mir-iam Stark, Judy

Ledgerwood and Bion Griffin. Phoeurn is the deputy director of the National Research

Committee and dean of the Faculty of Archeology at the Royal University of Fine Arts.

Stark and Griffin are professors in the Department of Anthropology at the University

of Hawaii. Ledgerwood came to Cambodia from the East-West Center in Hawaii.

"We would like to open a new era in archeological research into Cambodia's past

by focusing on the Funan civilization," says Church, noting that the long-term

project represents a reorientation of the study of Cambodia's past, from focusing

on the Angkor civilization to earlier periods.

Stark said that the team chose Angkor Borei, located about ten kms from the Vietnamese

border, for their study because it was an important early center of the Funan civilization,

a predecessor of the Angkor civilization, and because of its relative safety.

Chuch said that two of the three most important Funan sites are in Cambodia - at

Bah Phnom in Prey Veng and at Ankgor Borei. The third is Oc Eo in southern Vietnam.

Angkor Borei was also chosen because the archeological deposits there are sufficiently

intact - in spite of recent looting - to merit long-term research.

Oc Eo, in southern Vietnam, first excavated in the 1950s by Louis Malleret, has been

largely destroyed through vandalism since, though French archeological teams are

said to be planning to resume research there.

Angkor Borei is also interesting because it has a city wall and moat which can still

be discerned on aerial photographs and appear on topographic maps. Stark said: "Angkor

Borei has the ruins of at least ten temples, probably dating from the first centuries

A.D."

On nearby Phnom Da sits an eleventh century temple on the ruins of a seventh century

temple.

Funan was a civilization that stretched east and south into Vietnam, and also west

across Thailand and south as far as present day peninsular Malaysia, perhaps into

Sumatra, Stark said.

Of the three major Funan sites, Angkor Borei is certainly the oldest and "all

evidence points to Funan as being one of the earliest civilizations in south east

Asia," Stark said.

But the exact date of Angkor Borei's earliest occupation, and of the Funan civilization

that historians believe existed there, is still not known.

Part of the aim of the research is to make headway on this problem, and to understand

"how they lived and what they did." The research also hopes to find evidence

on the question of whether the Funan civilization was Khmer, as Cambodian scholars

believe, and as Vietnamese scholars have disputed.

For Chuch and other scholars, though not all, the question of continuity between

the Funan and Angkor civilizations is an important one, and Chuch hopes that these

investigations will also shed some light on the question.

Funan is the name given the culture in the lower Mekong by Chinese travelers who

provided descriptions of what they saw from the third to the sixth centuries.

The famous French scholar George Coedes also used the name Funan for the civilization

that preceded Angkor, and described walled settlements, wooden palaces and active

trade networks that characterized some settlements throughout the lower Mekong Delta.

The answer to the question of continuity is a point of dispute between Vietnamese

and Cambodian scholars.

Vietnamese scholars visiting Hawaii this past year are quoted by Cambodians who attended

the meetings as claiming that the Funan civilization is a fore-runner of the Vietnamese

rather than the Angkor (Khmer) civilization.

But many in the Cambodian archeological community firmly believe that the Funan civilization

was in a very real sense "Khmer."

Vietnamese scholars are quoted as saying: "The Funan empire existed before Khmer

ethnicity arose. Linguistic evidence that these people were indeed Khmer is simply

lacking."

The first date for a confirmed Khmer language inscription accepted by all scholars

is the seventh century. These scholars also emphasized the fact that more than eighty

sites similar to Angkor Borei have been identified in southern Vietnam.

Angkor Borei may have already provided some evidence for pushing back the date.

A large inscribed schist stone is awaiting translation and dating. The temple from

which it came will be dated using Carbon-14 techniques, and if the translation confirms

that the transcription is Khmer, the earliest date of confirmed Khmer language usage

may be pushed back into the fourth or fifth century from the seventh century date

currently accepted by scholars, and perhaps more importantly, into the Funan civilization.

Stark says that the temples of Angkor Borei, as they are uncovered, might also provide

evidence that will bear on the question of continutity.

"As the [ten Angkor Borei] temples are uncovered, we might see continuities

between those at Angkor Borei" and those later constructed during the Angkor

Empire.

But Stark emphasized that American-style archeology is equally or more concerned

with other kinds of questions than whether the people of Funan were Khmer.

"There is no question that the people of the Angkor empire were Khmer. But as

to Funan, we don't know what language they spoke, though we can find out how old

the site is, what agriculture was engaged in, what the demographic potential of the

site was. We can learn how they lived, and what they did.

"But whether they were Khmer is perhaps an unanswerable question."

RECOMMENDED STORIES

  • Breaking: PM says prominent human rights NGO ‘must close’

    Prime Minister Hun Sen has instructed the Interior Ministry to investigate the Cambodian Center for Human Rights (CCHR) and potentially close it “because they follow foreigners”, appearing to link the rights group to the opposition Cambodia National Rescue Party's purported “revolution”. The CNRP - the

  • Rainsy and Sokha ‘would already be dead’: PM

    Prime Minister Hun Sen on Sunday appeared to suggest he would have assassinated opposition leaders Sam Rainsy and Kem Sokha had he known they were promising to “organise a new government” in the aftermath of the disputed 2013 national elections. In a clip from his speech

  • Massive ceremony at Angkor Wat will show ‘Cambodia not in anarchy’: PM

    Government officials, thousands of monks and Prime Minister Hun Sen himself will hold a massive prayer ceremony at Angkor Wat in early December to highlight the Kingdom’s continuing “peace, independence and political stability”, a spectacle observers said was designed to disguise the deterioration of

  • PM tells workers CNRP is to blame for any sanctions

    In a speech to workers yesterday, Prime Minister Hun Sen pinned the blame for any damage inflicted on Cambodia’s garment industry by potential economic sanctions squarely on the opposition party. “You must remember clearly that if the purchase orders are reduced, it is all