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Arbitration leader quits after degree

Cambodia's Arbitration Council announced last week that the head of the labour relations body, Sok Lor, has officially left his position as executive director.

The Friday email from acting executive director, Men Nimmith, said Lor, who had been on a sabbatical from the council for nearly a year while he completed a master’s degree in law at Harvard University, resigned.

“The Arbitration Council Foundation [during] Mr. Sok Lor’s tenure, it was a progressive period,” Nimmith said. “I see Lor has done a very good job, having great relations with partners, donors, and he has maintained the functions to be independent.”

Nimmith will remain acting head of the council while the board of directors looks for a permanent replacement, he said. The process could take up to two months.

Dave Welsh, country director for labour group Solidarity Center, yesterday praised Lor, who headed the Council since 2009, and hoped that the standards he set remain in place.

“In a context where [labour] dispute resolution and access to justice and the rule of law are deeply flawed, the Arbitration Council really stands out,” Welsh said.

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