Search form

Login - Register | FOLLOW US ON

Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - B Meanchey provincial governor dies in crash

B Meanchey provincial governor dies in crash

The provincial governor of Banteay Meanchey was killed in a traffic accident in Battambang’s Mong Russey district yesterday morning after his car hit a truck on National Road 5.

Try Narin, 36, was travelling to Phnom Penh, according to provincial deputy police chief Chet Vanny.

“Try Narin’s car was speeding and hit the front of a truck [that lacked] reflective lights; his car hit the truck full force. We sent him to hospital, but he died [on the way],” Vanny said, adding that Narin’s chauffeur sustained minor injuries.

The family is expected to travel from the capital to arrange funeral rites and allow officials to pay their respects according to Chan Kosal, a deputy provincial police chief.

Narin appeared to be on the political fast track – after starting as a commune chief in the capital’s Niroth commune, he went on to serve as Poipet town’s governor and was appointed provincial governor in May this year, provincial spokesman Ouk Keo Ratank said yesterday.

2

Comments

Please, login or register to post a comment
apsaravideo's picture

Maybe his car was driven like he owned the whole Road 5 by himself.

apsaravideo's picture

First off, all Cambodian provincial governor positions should not be appointed but they should be elected by voters. Secondly, being a governor shouldn't warrant you/your driver to drive like a madman.

Latest Video

Phnom Penh eats: Ptas Nak Battambang

As the name suggests, Ptsa Nak Battambang – which in English means Battambang's house – is the right place for those who want to try some of the province's typical dishes in Phnom Penh.

Q&A with Pung Chhiv Kek, Cambodia’s first female doctor and founder of rights group Licadho

Last year, Pung Chhiv Kek was awarded the Legion d’Honneur, France’s highest decoration, for services to peace-building and human rights.

“Electric guitar is possible. Why not chapey then?”

After more than a millennium in existence, Cambodia’s traditional two-stringed chapey has finally gone electric.