Search form

Login - Register | FOLLOW US ON

Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Beware nocturnal spirits

Beware nocturnal spirits

The annual festival of Pchum Ben has begun, and to help our readers understand

a little more about its origins and meanings, Charlotte McDonald-Gibson peers

behind the spiritual curtain.

You had better watch out for the next week or so - tormented souls who have been

languishing in hell all year have been let out and are roaming Cam-bodia's streets,

paddy fields and temples looking for gifts from relatives to help them get by in

the underworld.

Woe betide any family who neglects their demands. It is said that the mournful spirits

will bring misfortune upon any living relatives who fail to leave offerings at a

temple during the two-week Pchum Ben festival, which began September 22.

"Cambodians believe that when their ancestors die the spirits live on,"

says Miech Ponn, assistant at the Buddhist Institute's Custom Commission. "During

the Pchum Ben festival the spirits leave hell to get food from their relatives. If

they do not find food they curse the families."

It is a deeply rooted belief, he says, and across the country people will flock to

the temples to appease the souls of dead ancestors with offerings of food.

The Pchum Ben tradition is said to date back to ancient times, when Buddha decided

to make life easier for monks during their three-month wet season retreat.

"In the rainy season the monks could not go out from house to house to collect

food," says Ponn. "So instead people brought food to the monks."

Pchum Ben evolved to become the celebration of the dead it is today. The Venerable

Yos Hut Khemacaro of Wat Langka says honoring of ancestors is ingrained in Buddha's

teachings.

"It is about reverence and gratitude to old benefactors," says Khemacaro."[The

monks] listen and they meditate on behalf of the people's dead relatives. They ...

make wishes for the family who bring food and offerings. They hope that the deceased

will be happy."

Across the globe the concept of honoring the dead is not uncommon. In Mexico parades

descend on graveyards every November to offer sugar skulls to the departed in a festival

that ends with an all-night party.

Lithuanians used to give beer and banquets to their expired relatives during the

Festival of the Dead, although nowadays the deceased have to make do with a few candles.

And if you happen to be an unhappy spirit resident in Taiwan, you can emerge from

the fires of misery for a week and listen to non-stop opera while gorging on lavish

feasts, before returning to the underworld with a pocketful of paper money.

So Pchum Ben is not unique, but it seems the spirits of the dead in Cambodia are

more demanding then their ghostly friends abroad - though recent indications are

that they have become more accommodating.

Tradition states that relatives should leave offerings at seven different pagodas,

but the deceased seem to have compromised on that.

"Nowadays you don't have to go to seven pagodas," said Ponn. "The

spirits will be happy if they find food in just one."

So what delicacies tickle the taste buds of the supernatural? Ponn says the departed

will happily munch on fruits and soup, but are particularly fond of sticky rice with

sesame, and a cake made of rice wrapped in banana leaves, known as Ansom cake.

And it seems earthly vices are also common beyond the grave - other popular offerings

are wine and cigarettes.

The festivities come to a climax on October 7.

"The monks will have breakfast and lunch where they eat the food to deliver

it to the dead spirits. They will also chant," says Ponn.

Pchum Ben ends when families return home from the pagoda and the spirits retire once

again to the fiery depths. In some places, families will float the spirits of long-gone

loved ones back to hell in a boat made from banana tree bark.

But until that time, beware when wandering the streets after dusk.

"Normally the people who live in hell only come out at night," says Ponn.

"Because they are naked, they must travel in the dark."

0

Comments

Please, login or register to post a comment

Latest Video

Turkish Embassy calls for closure of Zaman schools

With an attempted coup against the government of President Recep Erdogan quashed only days ago and more than 7,000 alleged conspirators now under arrest, the Turkish ambassador to Cambodia yesterday pressed the govern

CNRP lawmakers beaten

Two opposition lawmakers, Nhay Chamroeun and Kong Sakphea were beaten unconscious during protests in Phnom Penh, as over a thousand protesters descended upon the National Assembly.

Student authors discuss "The Cambodian Economy"

Student authors discuss "The Cambodian Economy"

Students at Phnom Penh's Liger Learning Center have written and published a new book, "The Cambodian Economy".