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Clarifying Anco report comments

Clarifying Anco report comments

In a report published in The Phnom Penh Post last Friday titled  “Anco report flawed: auditor”, inaccuracy in the translation from English into Khmer did not reflect exactly what I told Vincent MacIsaac and may lead readers to misunderstand my comments.

1.  When I spoke of  “my poor report” during my phone interview with MacIsaac, I told him that poor means too short compared to a normal report of this kind.

Without co-operation from the accused party, I cannot work normally, as indicated by the judge.

“My poor report” does not mean flawed or weak as translated in Khmer, but a short report showing the judge only the certified proof presented by Anco and that I have nothing else to say. “Poor report” here means having little substance.

2.  His audit is one-sided”: To say this is not correct (there is an idea of partiality with one-sided). My report mentioned only proof provided by one side because of the lack of co-operation from the accused party.

3.  “Is that this case cannot happen in a country other than Cambodia”:  Without appropriate explanation, this sentence may lead to grave misunderstanding.

In my interview, I just stressed that in Cambodia, we use to ignore the legal proceedings (here, on the refusal to meet the auditor from the accused party) that things happened this way.

Key Kak, 
Phnom Penh    


Vincent MacIsaac’s response: The report referred to was an accurate reflection of our telephone conversation on March 8.
All the quotes were exact.

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