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Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - CNRP get their say in National Assembly

The National Assembly, earlier this year. The position of National Assembly spokesman will be split into three roles to allow opposition representation.
The National Assembly, earlier this year. The position of National Assembly spokesman will be split into three roles to allow opposition representation. Scott Howes

CNRP get their say in National Assembly

The position of National Assembly spokesman will no longer be held exclusively by the ruling Cambodian People’s Party, with the role to be split in three, allowing for two partisan representatives and one from the parliament’s secretariat.

The decision issued yesterday and signed by National Assembly President Heng Samrin follows reforms to the parliament’s internal regulations agreed to by the CPP and opposition Cambodia National Rescue Party, approved late last month.

The CNRP had pushed for the role to be depoliticised, with long-time parliamentary spokesman Chheang Vun, also a CPP lawmaker, often criticised for bias in representing the body.

According to the decision, the parliament will appoint National Assembly General Secretary Leng Peng Long as a neutral spokesman.

Each party will also be permitted to put forward a candidate for the position. Yesterday, spokesmen for both parties said no selections had yet been made.

CNRP spokesman Eng Chhay Eang said the outcome showed compromise between the parties was possible.

“This is the result of efforts by both parties following debates to amend the internal regulations of the parliament,” Chhay Eang said.

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