Search form

Login - Register | FOLLOW US ON

Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Country set for fat prahok haul

Country set for fat prahok haul

091223_01
Fish from the first week’s catch of the prahok season wait to be sorted for market at Trang Chom Reas commune in Russey Keo district on Tuesday.

THIS year’s harvest of prahok is expected to increase by 20 percent compared with last year, officials at the Fisheries Administration said Monday.

Last year, Cambodian fishermen caught more than 12,000 tonnes of fish used to make prahok – a crushed, salted and fermented fish paste that is a staple of the Cambodian diet. They are expected to reel in up to 15,000 tonnes of fish in the 2009-10 season, said Fisheries Administration Director Nao Thuok. The prahok fishing season began last week and runs until late January.

Nao Thuok said that during the annual fishing ban, which runs from June until October, the administration created 280 fish shelters and released millions of baby fish into the country’s natural lakes and rivers. There was also a crackdown on illegal fishing, during which 1.5 million illegal fishnets were destroyed.

Despite Nao Thuok’s optimism, local fishermen said inclement weather could end up reducing the amount of available fish this year.

Ou Noun, a 67-year-old fisherman in Russey Keo district’s Prek Tasek commune, told the Post that until now he had been unable to catch fish because of the overcast cool season, and that shortages had driven up the price.

“Until Tuesday, I sold fish for the making of prahok for 2,500 riels [about US$0.60] per kilogram,” he said, noting that commercial fishing had driven the local price up from last year’s asking price of between 1,200 and 1,500 riels.

Nao Thuok also urged farmers to stock up on prahok and smoked fish to reserve for times when they expect to be busy with other agricultural activities.

0

Comments

Please, login or register to post a comment

Latest Video

Setting up a drone for flight. Photo supplied

How Cambodia's first drone company is helping farmers

SM Waypoint claims its unmanned aerial vehicles can help local farm and plantation owners increase their yields. Established in September 2015, SM Waypoint now has seven drone pilots, two sales staff and two accountants. Though the company focuses mainly on agricultural projects, the potential uses of the drones are extremely varied, going from measuring exact land height for building drainage systems to finding the most suitable location for special economic zones (SEZs) or factories.

New street food dish shakes things up at Russian Market

Though the bustling food stalls that emerge after dark next to Phnom Penh's Russian Market can seem intimidating to tourists at first glance, there are street food treats to be enjoyed by all, from Kep crab to a new shrimp dish created by the market's owners.

Turkish Embassy calls for closure of Zaman schools

With an attempted coup against the government of President Recep Erdogan quashed only days ago and more than 7,000 alleged conspirators now under arrest, the Turkish ambassador to Cambodia yesterday pressed the govern