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Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - EU envoy meets gov’t ‘human rights’ rep

EU ambassador George Edgar speaks during a press conference in Phnom Penh in April.
EU ambassador George Edgar speaks during a press conference in Phnom Penh in April. Heng Chivoan

EU envoy meets gov’t ‘human rights’ rep

The European Union’s ambassador to Cambodia, George Edgar, yesterday met with members of the government’s Cambodian Human Rights Committee.

In recent weeks, the EU has expressed concern over the “judicial harassment” of political opponents by the government, in light of the imprisonment of four human rights workers and an election official and the bringing of charges against several opposition party members.

After the meeting, CHRC head Keo Remy acknowledged Edgar had “expressed concern” about the current situation but commended Edgar’s manner and called the talks constructive.

“[The ambassador] did not come to attack Cambodia,” Remy said. “We discussed about the use of rights and law enforcement, and this is a good signal.”

In recent weeks, the CHRC has released videos characterising the opposition and elements of civil society as threats to the country’s stability.

Edgar said in an email the meeting was an “opportunity for me to hear from Keo Remy about how he sees the role of the CHRC”. He declined to comment further.

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