Search form

Login - Register | FOLLOW US ON

Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Figures ‘hiding’ human trafficking

Figures ‘hiding’ human trafficking

The US yesterday launched a US$5 million anti-human trafficking program in Cambodia, but according to a government audit of the US’s first counter-trafficking effort in Kingdom, significant challenges still need to be overcome.

The Counter-Trafficking in Persons II program (CTIP II) is a four-year effort that the US Embassy hopes “will build upon the notable achievements of CTIP I”, which originally ran from August 2006 until June 2009, and then received a two-year extension through last September.

However, the CTIP I program contained critical weaknesses, according to a 2009 audit by USAID’s Office of Inspector General.

”Without estimates of the scope of human trafficking to use as baselines in project locations, it is difficult to determine where interventions are most needed and would have the greatest impact,” it said, citing US Government Accountability Office reports.

Eric Meldrum, operations director for South East Asian Investigations in Social and Humanitarian Activities, an anti-human-trafficking organisation that was named as one of the sub-partners of the CTIP II program, echoed this need for more accurate statistics.

“Identifying traffic victims is problematic in this country,” he said, adding that the figures released by the government were much lower than the actual scope of the problem.

These deflated numbers make trafficking an “invisible crime”, he said, and therefore put less “onus” on government officials.

Like its predecessor, the multi-million dollar CTIP II program will focus on the areas of prevention, protection and prosecution.

0

Comments

Please, login or register to post a comment

Latest Video

Phnom Penh eats: Homegrown veggies at Bayon Beoung Snor

​Nestled along National Road 1, Bayon Beoung Snor is a farm-cum-restaurant. The team grows their own vegetables, which they then use to whip up traditional Khmer food.

Bill Clough reflects on The Phnom Penh Post's 25 year history

The Post's publisher Bill Clough, under whose leadership the publication went from a fortnightly to a daily one, discusses his investment in Cambodia, his vision for the paper in an increasingly digital age,

People search for their names on the voter lists at a polling station in Kampong Cham’s Veal Vong commune earlier this month.

Four years ago, when the opposition snatched Kampong Cham away from the ruling party in 2013 national elections, it hinted at a deeper shift taking

Comfrel Executive Director Koul Panha speaks to the press at a meeting yesterday in Phnom Penh.

As the National Election Committee launched into the recount proc