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Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Hun Sen to pay fine for helmetless moto trip

Prime Minsiter Hun Sen rides on the back of a local’s motorcycle earlier this month without a helmet on during a provincial trip to Koh Kong. Facebook
Prime Minsiter Hun Sen rides on the back of a local’s motorcycle earlier this month without a helmet on during a provincial trip to Koh Kong. Facebook

Hun Sen to pay fine for helmetless moto trip

Billing it as proof that no politician is above the law, Prime Minister Hun Sen yesterday announced he would pay a fine for riding a moto without a helmet.

Last weekend, Hun Sen posted a video to Facebook of himself riding a moto 500 metres across a bridge in Koh Kong province. Cambodian social media users were shocked when it was pointed out the premier was not wearing a helmet, as required under the Traffic Law.

In a post to Facebook yesterday, Hun Sen said he would pay the standard 15,000 riel ($3.75) fine at 9am this morning, as well as that of the man whose motorbike he was sharing a ride on.

Accompanying the post was a copy of a traffic ticket made out in his name with the words: “Please pay the fine in Phnom Penh.” And that is what he said he plans to do this morning at Daun Penh district’s Chaktomuk commune police station.

“The parliamentary immunity in the Constitution and elsewhere does not allow members of the National Assembly or the prime minister to avoid fines by the traffic police,” he said.

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Comments

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Don Rennie's picture

Dear Sokheng,

I think it is good that the PM goes out into the Provinces and meets people unannounced.

Riding on a motorbike without a helmet is not a good idea, and paying the fine is a nice gesture that guarantees positive press coverage.

DR

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