Search form

Login - Register | FOLLOW US ON

Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - ID cards and visitor names key to security

ID cards and visitor names key to security

The old system used by the communists of householders reporting to the authorities

the names of all visitors staying overnight in their houses in Phnom Penh has returned.

The Phnom Penh municipal authority has announced through the television and radio

the reintroduction of the system.

Sok Lekhena, deputy chief of Phnom Penh municipal cabinet said that this can improve

residential security as well as the general security.

He said people had been murdered by visitors who then disappeared without a trace.

He added that the move would allow authorities to match registrations with arrest

warrants so they could find wanted suspects.

He said hotel and guest house owners would also be required to provide a list of

people staying in their establishments.

Chun Sath, acting secretary general of Adhoc, agreed the plan would help fight crime

but he said he was worried that the authorities could misuse the information in some

way.

The plan comes at time when the authorities are already introducing a new national

identity card system.

The new cards are being printed in China with Chinese foreign aid assistance.

Civil servants will be the first group to be issued with the cards.

Lekhena said that the new cards would be very difficult to forge because they were

using a new system of manufacture.

He said the people's photographs were part of the card and not just stuck on.

He said in addition to providing identification the cards would contain biographical

information which would also be registered on a computer.

0

Comments

Please, login or register to post a comment

Latest Video

Phnom Penh eats: Homegrown veggies at Bayon Beoung Snor

​Nestled along National Road 1, Bayon Beoung Snor is a farm-cum-restaurant. The team grows their own vegetables, which they then use to whip up traditional Khmer food.

Bill Clough reflects on The Phnom Penh Post's 25 year history

The Post's publisher Bill Clough, under whose leadership the publication went from a fortnightly to a daily one, discusses his investment in Cambodia, his vision for the paper in an increasingly digital age,

NEC officials tally votes during a recount last week in Phnom Penh.

Cambodia’s National Election Committee last week rejected 33 of 61 complaints filed over the conduct of June 4’s commune election, according to a s

People search for their names on the voter lists at a polling station in Kampong Cham’s Veal Vong commune earlier this month.

Four years ago, when the opposition snatched Kampong Cham away from the ruling party in 2013 national elections, it hinted at a deeper shift taking