Search

Search form

Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Indochinese road network on track

Indochinese road network on track

Indochinese road network on track

A BLUEPRINT has been laid for linking all of Indochina through new roads, railways,

water and air transport.

Thirty-three transport projects are on the drawing board of the Greater Mekong Subregion

transport forum, sponsored by the Asian Development Bank (ADB).

The plan is dependent on the cooperation of Burma, Cambodia, China, Laos, Thailand

and Vietnam.

Though the history of such cooperation is poor, the experts involved in the projects

are optimistic.

"Progress is being made," said ADB's Programs Department West director

Noritada Morita, at the second meeting of the forum held recently in Phnom Penh.

The top priority of the six road development projects is that of a highway linking

Bangkok, Phnom Penh, Ho Chi Minh City and the Vietnamese port of Vung Tau.

The final feasibility study has been completed and construction was likely to begin

by 1997, said an official at Cambodia's Ministry of Planning.

The 568 kilometer Cambodian leg of the 1,000 kilometer long highway is expected to

cost about $200 million if it is to be of international standard.

The Cambodian Government - wary of security concerns on its eastern border - will

concentrate on the Phnom Penh-Ho Chi Minh route first.

The travelling time by road between the two cities will be cut to about three hours.

The construction now being done between Phnom Penh and Sihanoukville - with United

States funding - will eventually form part of a continuous highway between Kunming,

China through Laos to southern Cambodia. Japanese aid is rehabilitating some parts

of the northern-bound road to Laos.

According to documents from the ADB-sponsored forum's meeting, the ADB is now looking

at "the possibility of financial support" from both itself and other donors

for the Bangkok-Phnom Penh-Ho Chi Minh highway.

"A study of the Thai-Laos-Vietnam east-west corridor is underway under the auspices

of the French Technical Assistance fund," according to the documents.

"Detailed study for developing a masterplan for improving Cambodia's international

airports will soon be completed under the auspices... of the ADB."

It said that loans had recently been approved to Laos for its part of the Laos-Cambodian

highway.

One of the biggest issues holding back cooperation between the six riparian countries

is their lack of common structures on customs and immigration regulations.

With only a few exceptions, motor vehicles are not allowed to cross Indochinese borders

and examples are many where goods have been delayed for days at check points.

Taxes and extortions are commonly imposed on shippers along the Mekong river.

"Governments are called upon to adopt necessary rules, regulations and agreements

to facilitate the use of [this] infrastructure," Morita told officials. She

said it would improve their economies and the viability of developments.

However, an official with the Ministry of Public Works in Phnom Penh admitted the

reforms were "quite difficult".

All Mekong neighbors would have to set up seperate border agreements. Hanoi and Phnom

Penh, and Bangkok and Vientiane were holding talks to resolve this, the ministry

official said.

At the meeting, all countries - for the first time - agreed to standardize custom

and immigration regulations.

This would ensure a trade zone with open borders and free movement of goods and people

across borders. They also agreed to try bringing traffic signs and rules up to international

standards.

Morita applauded Cambodia for its enthusiasm shown at the forum.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

  • Breaking: PM says prominent human rights NGO ‘must close’

    Prime Minister Hun Sen has instructed the Interior Ministry to investigate the Cambodian Center for Human Rights (CCHR) and potentially close it “because they follow foreigners”, appearing to link the rights group to the opposition Cambodia National Rescue Party's purported “revolution”. The CNRP - the

  • Rainsy and Sokha ‘would already be dead’: PM

    Prime Minister Hun Sen on Sunday appeared to suggest he would have assassinated opposition leaders Sam Rainsy and Kem Sokha had he known they were promising to “organise a new government” in the aftermath of the disputed 2013 national elections. In a clip from his speech

  • Massive ceremony at Angkor Wat will show ‘Cambodia not in anarchy’: PM

    Government officials, thousands of monks and Prime Minister Hun Sen himself will hold a massive prayer ceremony at Angkor Wat in early December to highlight the Kingdom’s continuing “peace, independence and political stability”, a spectacle observers said was designed to disguise the deterioration of

  • PM tells workers CNRP is to blame for any sanctions

    In a speech to workers yesterday, Prime Minister Hun Sen pinned the blame for any damage inflicted on Cambodia’s garment industry by potential economic sanctions squarely on the opposition party. “You must remember clearly that if the purchase orders are reduced, it is all