Search form

Login - Register | FOLLOW US ON

Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - ‘Insults’ to be banned from PM’s Facebook page

Prime Minister Hun Sen’s Facebook page as seen in February.
Prime Minister Hun Sen’s Facebook page as seen in February. Hong Menea

‘Insults’ to be banned from PM’s Facebook page

Self-proclaimed “e-premier” Hun Sen on Saturday announced that “insulting” comments would no longer be tolerated on his Facebook page.

In recent months, the prime minister has promoted his page as the best way for citizens to lodge their grievances, at times responding with sweeping pronouncements, in one instance cancelling toll contracts on major roads.

In two posts on Saturday, however, Hun Sen warned that “Insulting pictures and comments posted on this page will be banned and blocked,” and insinuated that their authors would be banned as well.

Government spokesman Phay Siphan called the move a “good order”, but grassroots political activist Kem Ley said politicians shouldn’t shy from criticism,and even insulting comments should be left for the public to evaluate themselves.

The premier did not make clear what qualifies as “insulting”, but one Facebook user going by the moniker “Lomein Notaste” said his posts had been taken down three times.

The comments, he said, called on Hun Sen to stop pointing fingers at the opposition and to allow for a peaceful transition of power in order to safeguard his legacy.

0

Comments

Please, login or register to post a comment

Latest Video

Explore the durian and rubber farms of Kampong Cham

Take a drive north of Kampong Cham, past the dirt roads and the dense greenery.

Kem Sokha talks politics, power and Hun Sen

Kem Sokha, leader of the Cambodia National Rescue Party, sat down with The Post’s Alex Willemyns and Mech Dara to discuss his supporters’ initial disappointment with this year’s

NEC officials tally votes during a recount last week in Phnom Penh.

Cambodia’s National Election Committee last week rejected 33 of 61 complaints filed over the conduct of June 4’s commune election, according to a s

People search for their names on the voter lists at a polling station in Kampong Cham’s Veal Vong commune earlier this month.

Four years ago, when the opposition snatched Kampong Cham away from the ruling party in 2013 national elections, it hinted at a deeper shift taking