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Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - King OKs judiciary laws

King OKs judiciary laws

Three widely condemned laws concerning the operation of the Kingdom’s judiciary were officially signed into effect by King Norodom Sihamoni last month, according to recent copies of the Royal Book.

The laws on the Supreme Council of Magistracy, the organisation of the courts and the roles of judges and prosecutors were universally slammed outside of the ruling party for erasing the wall between the executive and judicial branches.

Nonetheless, the Royal Book says that on July 16, the King signed off on “the use of [the laws] that the National Assembly has approved on May 23…and [which were] completely approved by the Senate on June 12, and [in] the announcement from the Constitutional Council on the 2nd of July”.

Opposition spokesman Yim Sovann said yesterday that CNRP lawmakers will review the laws soon once in parliament, “and if it does not benefit the nation, we will request an amendment”.

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Max_Hydr0's picture

King Norodom Sihamoni is considered a very nice man and cares greatly about the citizens of Cambodia under his Royal purview. However, I do question his credentials as an expert on judicial matters. After all, that is why he has a multitude advisors on retainer. Consequently, perhaps he was misinformed and made an error by approving the three judiciary laws brought before him for official approval. I do hope that the CNRP lawmakers will a more thorough review of these legislative laws and come to a more objective result than the CPP parliamentarians failed to do in May.

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