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Letter: The CMAC scandal

Dear editor,

The Cambodian Mine Action Center's monetary misconduct has brought concerns from

some donor countries and organizations; even worse, some countries have temporarily

or conditionally frozen their aid to CMAC.

What will happen if they cut off their aid? And who will suffer?

The answer is that landmines will remain in Cambodia for many years more and only

the people will suffer.

As a poor country, an aid receiver, whether we want to or not we have to do all the

things we can to satisfy donors, and in this case it is very simple to satisfy them:

just use their money effectively and efficiently. Also, that is for our own good.

But in contrast they caused some problems; that is really stupid, isn't it. And how

do the people in CMAC respond to these problems? They reluctantly and maybe orally

admit the facts. It is funny, don't you think? Why not? Why didn't they respond more

strongly and seriously by conducting a complete inquiry, finding out the person or

people responsible, and appropriately punish them?

Some minefields that were not completely cleared were reported to be cleared. What

will happen when the people farm that land? Who will be responsible for the damage?

If such a thing is going on and on, how can Cambodia get rid of landmines?

There is no joke with landmines. If we don't kill (demine) them, they will kill or

maim us one day for sure.

Sue Samnang, Japan

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