Search

Search form

Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Meet talks climate funds

Meet talks climate funds

A worker guides a solar panel into place at a factory on the outskirts of Phnom Penh in 2014.
A worker guides a solar panel into place at a factory on the outskirts of Phnom Penh in 2014. Vireak Mai

Meet talks climate funds

A self-styled ideas forum hosted by the Climate Investment Funds and Asian Development Bank over the past two days sought to bring developing nations together to share lessons learned on climate change, though some yesterday questioned whether certain stumbling blocks were being overlooked.

The conference – set to conclude today – gathered 90 experts from 27 different countries with the aim of allowing government, private sector and civil society representatives from developing countries to discuss financial and technological solutions to the challenges of embracing renewable energy.

Zhizhong Zhang, a senior program director with CIF, said he believed that renewable resource technology – of the sort funding from organisations like the ADB can provide – will prove integral to Cambodia’s development and its ability to mitigate the effects of climate change. However, he acknowledged that short-term considerations – particularly a “need to lift people out of poverty quickly” – will continue to outweigh these goals for the foreseeable future.

But attendee Socheath Sou, director of Live and Learn Environmental Education Cambodia, said that while he found the conference’s emphasis on collaboration between banks and governments helpful, it did not address what he considered Cambodia’s greatest challenge: a severe knowledge gap.

“There is no capacity at all,” he said. “We know there are lots of channels of funding, but how many people can come up with proposals, investment plans, or actually design energy systems?”

Tin Ponlok, of the Ministry of Environment and the Cambodia Climate Change AllianceTrust Fund Secretariat, meanwhile, argued that the knowledge gap extended even further, to a “lack of reliable research on how climate change will affect communities, how it will change forestry, fisheries, and agriculture”.

Martin de Bourmont

RECOMMENDED STORIES

  • Breaking: PM says prominent human rights NGO ‘must close’

    Prime Minister Hun Sen has instructed the Interior Ministry to investigate the Cambodian Center for Human Rights (CCHR) and potentially close it “because they follow foreigners”, appearing to link the rights group to the opposition Cambodia National Rescue Party's purported “revolution”. The CNRP - the

  • Rainsy and Sokha ‘would already be dead’: PM

    Prime Minister Hun Sen on Sunday appeared to suggest he would have assassinated opposition leaders Sam Rainsy and Kem Sokha had he known they were promising to “organise a new government” in the aftermath of the disputed 2013 national elections. In a clip from his speech

  • Massive ceremony at Angkor Wat will show ‘Cambodia not in anarchy’: PM

    Government officials, thousands of monks and Prime Minister Hun Sen himself will hold a massive prayer ceremony at Angkor Wat in early December to highlight the Kingdom’s continuing “peace, independence and political stability”, a spectacle observers said was designed to disguise the deterioration of

  • PM tells workers CNRP is to blame for any sanctions

    In a speech to workers yesterday, Prime Minister Hun Sen pinned the blame for any damage inflicted on Cambodia’s garment industry by potential economic sanctions squarely on the opposition party. “You must remember clearly that if the purchase orders are reduced, it is all