Search

Search form

Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Model stalls provide vendors from Preah Vihear an array of options

Model stalls provide vendors from Preah Vihear an array of options

Model stalls provide vendors from Preah Vihear an array of options

090817_03b
A soldier stands in the ruins of the Preah Vihear market days after it was destroyed by border fighting.

Displaced families will begin selecting stalls this week, although there is still no word on when the market will be fully rebuilt and operational.

BEGINNING this week, vendors at a market near Preah Vihear temple that was demolished by Thai rocket fire in early April are to have the opportunity to choose from new stalls designed by the Preah Vihear National Authority (PVNA).

"We finished construction of the model stalls over the weekend," said Hang Soth, the PVNA's director general. "We will allow people to choose whichever stall they want, and later there will be a ballot so they can choose a location."

The stalls come in three sizes: 2-by-4 metres, 4-by-12 metres and 4-by-20 metres. Hang Soth said vendors would need to pay for the stalls themselves, adding that a 4-by-12-metre stall would cost roughly US$2,000.

About 319 families who lived and worked at the market were displaced during an exchange of gunfire between Cambodian and Thai soldiers on April 3 that destroyed all 264 stalls, according to accounts from Cambodian military officials.

The Cambodian government in May demanded US$2.1 million from the Thai government to pay for the damages, though there has been no response from Bangkok.

Prime Minister Hun Sen said last month that he wanted to see the market completely rebuilt by late July.

Thailand's border communications office wrote on July 30 to its Cambodian counterpart, claiming that the construction of new stalls at the market violated a memorandum of understanding on border demarcation signed between the two countries in 2000.

Cambodian officials rejected that claim, saying the market reconstruction had nothing to do with the continuing standoff over contested territory.

Sor Thavy, deputy governor of Preah Vihear province, said Sunday that he did not know when construction of the market would be complete.

"We have tried to get this work finished because we want people to get their businesses running and begin serving tourists in the area," he said.

"I hope people can start building their stalls soon."

RECOMMENDED STORIES

  • Breaking: PM says prominent human rights NGO ‘must close’

    Prime Minister Hun Sen has instructed the Interior Ministry to investigate the Cambodian Center for Human Rights (CCHR) and potentially close it “because they follow foreigners”, appearing to link the rights group to the opposition Cambodia National Rescue Party's purported “revolution”. The CNRP - the

  • Rainsy and Sokha ‘would already be dead’: PM

    Prime Minister Hun Sen on Sunday appeared to suggest he would have assassinated opposition leaders Sam Rainsy and Kem Sokha had he known they were promising to “organise a new government” in the aftermath of the disputed 2013 national elections. In a clip from his speech

  • Massive ceremony at Angkor Wat will show ‘Cambodia not in anarchy’: PM

    Government officials, thousands of monks and Prime Minister Hun Sen himself will hold a massive prayer ceremony at Angkor Wat in early December to highlight the Kingdom’s continuing “peace, independence and political stability”, a spectacle observers said was designed to disguise the deterioration of

  • PM tells workers CNRP is to blame for any sanctions

    In a speech to workers yesterday, Prime Minister Hun Sen pinned the blame for any damage inflicted on Cambodia’s garment industry by potential economic sanctions squarely on the opposition party. “You must remember clearly that if the purchase orders are reduced, it is all