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Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - More trafficked brides return

A Cambodian woman follows family members out of Phnom Penh International Airport
A Cambodian woman follows family members out of Phnom Penh International Airport yesterday afternoon after she was repatriated from China. Vireak Mai

More trafficked brides return

Two more Cambodian women who were allegedly cheated by human traffickers into marrying Chinese men were repatriated yesterday.

Twelve women were staying at the Cambodian consulate in China’s Guangzhou province last week, four of whom had already returned home to Cambodia.

The women returning yesterday, aged 20 and 27, are from Kampong Thom and Ratanakkiri provinces.

Lim Mony, deputy head of women and children for local rights group Adhoc, said the women had been mistreated.

One of the victims’ mothers yesterday claimed her pregnant daughter had been deprived of food and beaten regularly.

“I’m thankful [my daughter] came back, but I’m also sad, as she is four months pregnant from her forced marriage and she was mistreated,” she said.

Several other women were also staying at the Cambodian consulate in Shanghai, according to a statement from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

One of the women tricked into moving to China for marriage yesterday warned others of the “deceitfulness” of the brokers. “I’ve been there and experienced it,” she said. “It’s so very difficult.”

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