Search form

Login - Register | FOLLOW US ON

Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Multiparty political forum tackles gender inequality

Women attend a panel on women in the workforce at the Sunway Hotel in Phnom Penh
Women attend a panel on women in the workforce at the Sunway Hotel in Phnom Penh. Hong Menea

Multiparty political forum tackles gender inequality

Political parties seeking National Assembly seats in the election later this month expounded on their strong commitment to promoting and protecting the rights of women and children at a roundtable discussion yesterday.

Representatives of seven of the eight parties competing for seats – excluding the Khmer Economic Development Party – discussed matters pertinent to women and children like rape and violence.

The discussion was organised by the Committee for Free and Fairs Election in Cambodia, the Cambodian Center for Human Rights and UN Women.

Funcipec representative Prak Chantha vowed not only to enforce current legal protections for women but to establish a quota of 30 per cent female representation at the national and local levels.

On a similar note, Khmer Anti-Poverty Party president Daran Kravanh said women should represent half of all workers, especially in traditionally male-dominated fields.

“It is something that we need to reform,” Kravanh said at the forum. “The party policy is to encourage women to work in the fields like men, 50 per cent.”

Speaking for the ruling Cambodian People’s Party, Chou Bun Eng, Secretary of State at Ministry of Interior, said the CPP has worked hard to promote equal opportunities for women. She posed that the CPP’s commitment to equality can be seen in their equal intolerance of law breakers.

“The CPP never tolerates anyone who has committed an offence,” Bun Eng said. “Even if they are the government officials.”

Yang Phaneth, a Prey Veng province candidate for the opposition Cambodia National Rescue Party, said that while women outnumber men in the population, their representation in the National Assembly does not reflect that fact.

“Women and children are more vulnerable, but there is no representative to help them,” Phaneth said.

0

Comments

Please, login or register to post a comment

Latest Video

Phnom Penh eats: Homegrown veggies at Bayon Beoung Snor

​Nestled along National Road 1, Bayon Beoung Snor is a farm-cum-restaurant. The team grows their own vegetables, which they then use to whip up traditional Khmer food.

Bill Clough reflects on The Phnom Penh Post's 25 year history

The Post's publisher Bill Clough, under whose leadership the publication went from a fortnightly to a daily one, discusses his investment in Cambodia, his vision for the paper in an increasingly digital age,

People search for their names on the voter lists at a polling station in Kampong Cham’s Veal Vong commune earlier this month.

Four years ago, when the opposition snatched Kampong Cham away from the ruling party in 2013 national elections, it hinted at a deeper shift taking

Comfrel Executive Director Koul Panha speaks to the press at a meeting yesterday in Phnom Penh.

As the National Election Committee launched into the recount proc