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Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - No word on Howes and Hourth

No word on Howes and Hourth

N O further information has come to light about kidnapped British deminer Christopher

Howes, in the wake of political tension, according to Royal Cambodian Armed Forces

sources.

Radio communication was last established Nov 21 with a band of alleged Khmer Rouge

fugitives from Anlong Veng who were reported to have Howes, along with his Cambodian

interpreter Houn Hourth, with them.

"Contact with them was cut off while we were busy with internal problems,"

Gen Chea Sotha, chief of the Second Bureau at the Ministry of Defense, said Dec 10.

"We were concerned with other matters, that we did not think about them at the

time."

It was earlier reported that the group were being chased by 80 KR guerrillas dispatched

by a hardline chief, Ta Mok.

"I cannot tell you anything because the matter is secret," said Khan Savoeun,

military commander of Region 4.

According to Sotha, RCAF in November had settled on a reward of $10,000-20,000 with

the KR fugitives to secure the release of the hostages.

Reports of Howes imminent release led his wife and children to travel to Cambodia

from England. They have since returned home.

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