Search form

Login - Register | FOLLOW US ON

Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Poisioning is result of ‘bad prep’

Poisioning is result of ‘bad prep’

Lab results have revealed that an outbreak of food poisoning that left hundreds hospitalised in Siem Reap province last week was caused by bacteria likely passed on through unhygienic food preparation, an official said yesterday.

Dim Theng, lab director at CamControl, one of the Ministry of Commerce’s departments leading research into food safety, said tests of food samples had revealed that “it was bacteria poisoning, not chemical poisoning” that caused hundreds to fall sick after eating sandwiches at an event organised by Christian NGO World Vision.

Official results, he said, would be released in the coming days.

Theng added that those who prepared the sandwiches should be investigated.

Moeun Srey Oeuy, a representative of the Ponlork Thmey youth group, which prepared the food, insisted yesterday that her team had taken measures to ensure hygiene standards.

“I washed my hands and washed the vegetables using filtered water from the storage tank.”

Channpheaktra Hong, a World Vision spokesman, said the NGO is working to ensure food provided at its events is safe to eat, and will release a food-security policy this week.

0

Comments

Please, login or register to post a comment

Latest Video

Cambodia's last tile masters: Why a local craft is under threat

Brought over by the French, painted cement tile making has been incorporated into Cambodian design for more than a century, even as the industry has died out in Europe.

Interview: Loung Ung, author of First They Killed My Father

The story of Loung Ung and her family’s suffering under the Khmer Rouge became known around the world with the success of her autobiographical book, First They Killed My Father.

Setting up a drone for flight. Photo supplied

How Cambodia's first drone company is helping farmers

SM Waypoint claims its unmanned aerial vehicles can help local farm and plantation owners increase their yields.