Search form

Login - Register | FOLLOW US ON

Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Pollution sucks life out of cities

Pollution sucks life out of cities

Single-minded pursuit of rapid economic growth has caused an air and water pollution

crisis in many of Asia's cities, according to a U.N. report.

"Water-related diseases are the main cause of death in developing countries,"

said the U.N. Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific.

"About 35,000 children die each day, mostly from bacteria, viruses and other

pathogens in the water," it said.

In Bangkok, some stretches of the Chao Phraya River completely lack dissolved oxygen

and can no longer support life, the report said.

It said the rivers that flow into Asian cities already hold pathogens and pesticide

residues, then become even more polluted with sewage and industrial and household

wastes dumped directly into the water.

Air pollution has caused high rates of lung cancer, tuberculosis and bronchitis in

many cities.

"Sulphur dioxide and suspended dust levels can be tens to hundreds of times

worse than in U.S. or Canadian cities," the statement said.

It said that in Bangkok, dust levels in 1989 were estimated to have cost 26 million

lost work-days and 1,400 deaths.

Average levels of lead in the blood are four times the U.S. standard, and there is

evidence of permanent brain damage in children due to lead poisoning.

The statement said indoor pollution is a major health hazard, particularly for women

and children in poor households regularly exposed to high concentrations of pollutants

from cooking and from heating sources in poorly ventilated dwellings. -AP

0

Comments

Please, login or register to post a comment

Latest Video

Cambodia's last tile masters: Why a local craft is under threat

Brought over by the French, painted cement tile making has been incorporated into Cambodian design for more than a century, even as the industry has died out in Europe.

Interview: Loung Ung, author of First They Killed My Father

The story of Loung Ung and her family’s suffering under the Khmer Rouge became known around the world with the success of her autobiographical book, First They Killed My Father.

Setting up a drone for flight. Photo supplied

How Cambodia's first drone company is helping farmers

SM Waypoint claims its unmanned aerial vehicles can help local farm and plantation owners increase their yields.