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Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Poverty, not trickery, drives Vietnamese

Poverty, not trickery, drives Vietnamese

While there is still a widespread belief that Vietnamese women come to Cambodia

to leech the country of money through prostitution, with the occasional more

extreme view they are here to spread HIV/AIDS, recent studies show a different


An International Organization for Migration study, "Trafficking

of Vietnamese Women and Children to Cambodia," and a draft CARE report, "Cross

Border Cross Reality" both found financial desperation, often brought on by

family hardships, were the significant motivation for life as an immigrant


But the myths persist. The IOM survey said that "The idea of

the seductive power of Vietnamese women forms a recurrent theme in explanations

of how the Vietnamese will try to take over Cambodia.

"This conspiracy

theory or fantasy regarding the influx of Vietnamese women or girls as spies of

a greater power that will eventually take over, are a far cry from the stories

the women and girls themselves recount about their reasons for and experiences

in coming to Cambodia.

Care found that the Vietnamese women and children

coming to Phnom Penh, both independently and those trafficked, were generally

poor, ill-educated, and a significant number had recently had personal crises

such as a marriage break-up or family difficulties.

The report says that

after the recent economic reforms in Vietnam, while there were benefits to the

population, "the situation for those that are landless, unskilled and illiterate

has worsened." This is the group that brothels draw on for sex


Extensive interviews with 12 sex workers provided examples of

the situations which drove the women to prostitution.

"My mother was

sick, and we did not earn any money. That is why I decided to work. I wanted to

earn money for my mother's medical care," said one worker in the


"I had to save my mother's life. My pain was not as serious as

that of my mother's ... I told my mother that I worked here washing clothes for

wages. I did not dare to tell her the truth. If she knew this, she would not let

me do so."

Others made similar comments.

"Because of the family's

poverty I must commit myself for the sake of the family. I must work to repay

the debt," said another.

Though in one case there was a perceived social

pressure that lead to life in the brothels.

"I saw people happy and

wanted to be happy too ... this was my first time getting far from home ... (I

needed money) to buy a motorbike and return home ... just to avoid being looked

down upon by those who say a girl will never earn any money to buy such a bike

... once we are rich or richer they will make friends with us for


The choice of Cambodia can be traced back to UNTAC times when

there was a high demand for sex workers and a then-comparatively high market

price for sex. The market is no longer so favorable and high incomes of the

UNTAC period have never returned.

There was also a perception among the

sex workers that Cambodia was more liberal in its enforcement of

anti-prostitution legislation compared with Vietnam.

In the Care study

one sex worker said: "In Vietnam the selling of sex is not permitted. A woman

who sells her sex will be imprisoned. In Cambodia selling sex is possible though

not legal."

The highest-value item in a brothel is a virgin. The going

price is from $100 to $500. But the women themselves are lucky to ever see even

a fraction of that amount, and in some cases brothel owners claim the women owe

them a debt which even a substantial one-off payment cannot eradicate.


saw someone coming here [Cambodia] and I asked my mother to let me come here too

and sell my virginity for money to repay the [family] debt ... I only knew that

I could sell my virginity and go back home. But still I did not have any money

after I had lost my virginity. I have to continue working to repay the debt [to

the brothel]."

Another woman said she was simply deceived by a brothel

owner who told her she was not a virgin and she believed her, despite not

knowing "what virginity was."

But while the women in the above examples

made a conscious decision to work in the sex industry others were not given that


Some young women are persuaded to follow a recruiter to

Phnom Penh where they are promised good wages and honest work but once here they

find themselves sold to a brothel.

In the IOM study a 17-year-old girl

described how the recruiters operate.

"The people who persuade young

girls to come to Cambodia are mostly women. They are like friends, but they sell

their friends. They tell the girls that they can sell merchandise or work as a

waitress ... they only take young girls, of 16 or 17 years old," she


Another woman said she thought she was going to Stung Treng to work

in a coffee shop but when she arrived she found she had been sold by a friend to

a brothel for 50,000 riel. The brothel owner refused to release her and she felt

helpless because she could not speak Khmer.

But despite the realities the

studies still found a persistent belief that Vietnamese women were inherently


One community leader argued that it was a cultural trait of

the Vietnamese.

"Nearly 100 percent of the Vietnamese girls here are

prostitutes. It is their tradition, even if the daughter is from a rich family

... they mostly sell their daughters themselves."

A health worker in

Ratanakiri claimed that the Vietnamese women working in brothels were much

better off than their Khmer counterparts.

The worker said that the

parent's of the Vietnamese women received money from the recruiter and then got

to split the profits with the brothel owner while the Khmer women get


"The Khmer women are all deceived by the recruiters and meebon

(brothel owner) ... the money she earns goes to the meebon."


perception that the Vietnamese women were more financially aware and better

treated was repeated in other interviews.

"The Vietnamese women only work

for one or two months and they have a lot of jewelry. ... The Khmer women work

for two years and have nothing left."

"The Vietnamese women don't care

about their honor, because they know that when they go back to Vietnam they will

still become wives. It is very interesting, they earn money for a motorbike, or

a new house and when they get married they stop work. ... The Khmer women can't

earn money."

The IOM report says "these comparisons lead very much to the

image of Vietnamese women doing everything for money, with a clear goal and

without shame or fear of losing honor. This is explained by the idea that

Vietnamese women who have worked as prostitutes still remain marriageable once

they return to Vietnam.

"The Khmer women are, to the contrary, described

as victims of deception and exploitation who have no idea how to get money out

of such a dishonorable situation."



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