Search form

Login - Register | FOLLOW US ON

Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Project to fix capital’s drains kicks into gear

Labourers work to construct better drainage systems under a joint initiative of the municipality and the Japanese government in Phnom Penh
Labourers work to construct better drainage systems under a joint initiative of the municipality and the Japanese government in Phnom Penh’s Prampi Makara district. VIREAK MAI

Project to fix capital’s drains kicks into gear

The third phase of a project designed to revamp Phnom Penh’s drainage system, currently inundated by seasonal rains, began yesterday.

Four areas of the city spanning a total of 369,445 metres will be witness to the next stage of the project’s implementation, part of an ongoing $350 million drainage system project spearheaded by the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA).

Preliminary planning for the third stage began in 2012 and is slated for completion in 2015.

The latest construction dovetails with a city-wide campaign to clear garbage-filled pipes, launched last Saturday.

JICA has been working with City Hall since 1999 to improve the capital’s drainage system.

The initial two phases of the project’s implementation took nearly a decade to complete and cost more than $19 million.

The third instalment of the project will expand and repair drainage in four areas: 60,789 metres around Tuol Sleng; 19,058 metres around O’Russey; 162,871 in Boeung Keng Kang and 126,727 metres around Tuol Tumpong, Sam Piseth, director of the Ministry of Public Works and Transport, said.

All four areas in Chamkarmon, Daun Penh and Prampi Makara districts will be receiving “new draining and [new pipes] to ease flooding in the southern area of the city,” Sam said, adding that JICA is contributing four additional trucks to aid with drainage cleanup, repairs and technical support.

Last Friday at the project’s ceremonial launch, Phnom Penh Municipal Governor Pa Socheatvong asked local residents to be tolerant of traffic jams and other construction-related disturbances for the sake of the city’s betterment.

ADDITIONAL REPORTING BY AMELIA WOODSIDE

0

Comments

Please, login or register to post a comment

Latest Video

Setting up a drone for flight. Photo supplied

How Cambodia's first drone company is helping farmers

SM Waypoint claims its unmanned aerial vehicles can help local farm and plantation owners increase their yields. Established in September 2015, SM Waypoint now has seven drone pilots, two sales staff and two accountants. Though the company focuses mainly on agricultural projects, the potential uses of the drones are extremely varied, going from measuring exact land height for building drainage systems to finding the most suitable location for special economic zones (SEZs) or factories.

New street food dish shakes things up at Russian Market

Though the bustling food stalls that emerge after dark next to Phnom Penh's Russian Market can seem intimidating to tourists at first glance, there are street food treats to be enjoyed by all, from Kep crab to a new shrimp dish created by the market's owners.

Turkish Embassy calls for closure of Zaman schools

With an attempted coup against the government of President Recep Erdogan quashed only days ago and more than 7,000 alleged conspirators now under arrest, the Turkish ambassador to Cambodia yesterday pressed the govern