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Striking workers resign in trade-off

Tae Young factory workers have ended their strike demanding the reinstatement of 16 fired workers after the factory last week agreed to drop its legal complaints against eight of the 16 in return for the entire group’s official resignations.

About 600 protesters began the strike at the beginning of the month after the Kandal province factory refused to rehire the workers, who were fired in June for allegedly inciting an illegal strike.

The factory at the time also refused to drop a court case demanding that eight of the fired union members a pay the factory $60,000 each in compensation.

Un Bunkea, one of the fired union members, said yesterday that the 16 had already resigned and had received some benefits.

Bunkea said that he and four other workers have been hired by the Free Trade Union as recruitment officers and will begin their jobs tomorrow.

The other 11 workers who resigned will go work at other factories, he said.

To contact the reporter on this story: Mom Kunthear at kunthear.mom@phnompenhpost.com

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