Search form

Login - Register | FOLLOW US ON

Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Stronger wildlife laws needed, officials say

Stronger wildlife laws needed, officials say

NEW laws and harsher penalties are needed to prosecute people who trade in illegal wildlife, government officials said yesterday.

Speaking at the opening of a two-day regional anti-wildlife trafficking workshop in Phnom Penh, Justice Minister Ang Vong Vathana said that a lack of concrete wildlife management legislation combined with weak penalties for illegal traders meant there was little to deter would-be perpetrators.

“Wildlife trade is a serious problem threatening the national resources of Cambodia,” he said.

According to Article 93 of Cambodia’s Law on Forestry, passed in 2002, individuals found guilty of trading illegally in wildlife face prison sen-
tences of up to 10 years and fines of up to 100 million riels (US$23,518).

Tim Sipha, director of the Legislation and Law Enforcement Department at the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, said that 44 suspects had been sent to court charged with wildlife crimes so far this year.

“Wildlife crimes happen most in northeastern parts of the country where there are many forests,” he said.

Suon Sovann, deputy director of the Forestry Administration’s Legislation and Law Enforcement Department, said the government considered wildlife to be state property, and that it was therefore the state’s responsibility to protect species from poaching.

He said that most Cambodian wildlife trafficking was across the border for sale in neighbouring Vietnam and Laos.

0

Comments

Please, login or register to post a comment

Latest Video

Kem Sokha talks politics, power and Hun Sen

Kem Sokha, leader of the Cambodia National Rescue Party, sat down with The Post’s Alex Willemyns and Mech Dara to discuss his supporters’ initial disappointment with this year’s

Phnom Penh eats: Dine amid green gardens at Chol Chet

Located just off National Road 1 about 9km south of central Phnom Penh, Chol Chet — which means 'like' in Khmer — is a great getaway from the bustle of the capital.

NEC officials tally votes during a recount last week in Phnom Penh.

Cambodia’s National Election Committee last week rejected 33 of 61 complaints filed over the conduct of June 4’s commune election, according to a s

People search for their names on the voter lists at a polling station in Kampong Cham’s Veal Vong commune earlier this month.

Four years ago, when the opposition snatched Kampong Cham away from the ruling party in 2013 national elections, it hinted at a deeper shift taking