Search

Search form

Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Thailand explains land deal

Thailand explains land deal

Thailand explains land deal

THE Ambassador for Thailand has released details of the land transaction for the

site of Thailand's new embassy in Phnom Penh.

The Embassy became embroiled in a dispute with a neighboring village when it closed

an access road for the village which the embassy said ran across its land.

The villagers protested against the closure on Friday, June 2, and a bloody battle

erupted between them, police, and hired thugs who appeared to be acting on behalf

of the authorities.

George Cooper from Legal Aid Cambodia, who has been working with villagers, said

the Embassy had no right to own land in Cambodia because the constitution banned

the sale of land to foreign entities.

He said Legal Aid Cambodia would be pursuing the matter through the courts.

However Ambassador Asiphol Chabchigrchaidol rejected the claims that the embassy

had no right to land, saying the current site was obtained in 1992 through two separate

arrangements.

He said the first part of the embassy compound was bought from 64 families living

there for $450,000. He said the land title number was 194. The second half of the

compound was Government land that was gifted to them by the Cambodian Government

as part of a reciprocal deal in which the Thai Government gave land to Cambodians

for their embassy. He said such reciprocal arrangements were standard practice for

diplomatic missions and were entirely proper.

The Ambassador said the land was properly surveyed in 1993 in accordance with the

law and a temporary land permit was issued to the Embassy.

Then in 1996 the Council of Ministers gave permission for the Embassy to begin building

on the site.

He said they kept the road open even though they were not obliged to but once they

moved the chancellery in, they wanted to close the road for security and to enable

construction within the embassy to be completed.

He said that given the solid legal footing they had, the matter was one to be resolved

by the Cambodian authorities.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

  • Breaking: PM says prominent human rights NGO ‘must close’

    Prime Minister Hun Sen has instructed the Interior Ministry to investigate the Cambodian Center for Human Rights (CCHR) and potentially close it “because they follow foreigners”, appearing to link the rights group to the opposition Cambodia National Rescue Party's purported “revolution”. The CNRP - the

  • Rainsy and Sokha ‘would already be dead’: PM

    Prime Minister Hun Sen on Sunday appeared to suggest he would have assassinated opposition leaders Sam Rainsy and Kem Sokha had he known they were promising to “organise a new government” in the aftermath of the disputed 2013 national elections. In a clip from his speech

  • Massive ceremony at Angkor Wat will show ‘Cambodia not in anarchy’: PM

    Government officials, thousands of monks and Prime Minister Hun Sen himself will hold a massive prayer ceremony at Angkor Wat in early December to highlight the Kingdom’s continuing “peace, independence and political stability”, a spectacle observers said was designed to disguise the deterioration of

  • PM tells workers CNRP is to blame for any sanctions

    In a speech to workers yesterday, Prime Minister Hun Sen pinned the blame for any damage inflicted on Cambodia’s garment industry by potential economic sanctions squarely on the opposition party. “You must remember clearly that if the purchase orders are reduced, it is all