Search

Search form

Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Thousands stopped on roads

Thousands stopped on roads

A police officer writes out a ticket on the outskirts of Phnom Penh for a traffic offence at the weekend as motorists and other police officers look on. NATIONAL POLICE
A police officer writes out a ticket on the outskirts of Phnom Penh for a traffic offence at the weekend as motorists and other police officers look on. NATIONAL POLICE

Thousands stopped on roads

Authorities have wasted no time in making sure drivers obey the new Traffic Law that came into force on New Year’s Day, fining or “educating” over 24,000 road users in the first three days, part of a nationwide effort to encourage motorcyclists and others to follow the new rules.

Deputy director of the order department of the Ministry of Interior, Ty Long, said at a press conference yesterday that on January 3 alone, police had checked 30,312 vehicles and found 8,898 that had violated laws.

“The owners of 5,226 vehicles were educated [without a fine], while 3,672 drivers were issued a fine and 73 vehicles were impounded, most of which were failing to carry a number plate,” he said.

On the first day the new rules were applied, 7,519 vehicles were found to be in contravention of traffic laws, according to deputy National Police chief Hem Yan.

Of these offenders, 4,543 were let off without a fine, while 2,925 drivers were made to pay a penalty. More than 100 motorbikes were impounded.

“During the implementation, 80 per cent of people have perfectly obeyed the rules, and only a small number of people have not shown respect for the law,” Hem Yan said.

He added that the majority of violations involved motorcyclists and their passengers failing to wear helmets, which results in a 15,000 riel (about $3.75) fine, payable at a police station.

The director of the Institute for Road Safety, Ear Chariya, was supportive of efforts to implement the new rules, but said the public should be given more time to understand what was expected of them.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

  • Breaking: PM says prominent human rights NGO ‘must close’

    Prime Minister Hun Sen has instructed the Interior Ministry to investigate the Cambodian Center for Human Rights (CCHR) and potentially close it “because they follow foreigners”, appearing to link the rights group to the opposition Cambodia National Rescue Party's purported “revolution”. The CNRP - the

  • Rainsy and Sokha ‘would already be dead’: PM

    Prime Minister Hun Sen on Sunday appeared to suggest he would have assassinated opposition leaders Sam Rainsy and Kem Sokha had he known they were promising to “organise a new government” in the aftermath of the disputed 2013 national elections. In a clip from his speech

  • Massive ceremony at Angkor Wat will show ‘Cambodia not in anarchy’: PM

    Government officials, thousands of monks and Prime Minister Hun Sen himself will hold a massive prayer ceremony at Angkor Wat in early December to highlight the Kingdom’s continuing “peace, independence and political stability”, a spectacle observers said was designed to disguise the deterioration of

  • PM tells workers CNRP is to blame for any sanctions

    In a speech to workers yesterday, Prime Minister Hun Sen pinned the blame for any damage inflicted on Cambodia’s garment industry by potential economic sanctions squarely on the opposition party. “You must remember clearly that if the purchase orders are reduced, it is all