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Three charged over acid attacks

Phnom Penh Municipal Court on Friday charged two men and one woman with intentional violence after the men threw acid on two women last Tuesday, allegedly under orders from the wife of one of the men, police officials said yesterday.

Rin Soklim, 24, and Seng Touch, 26, were attacked at about 9pm last Tuesday in Phnom Penh’s Meanchey district.

“I charged them with intentional violence under articles 217 and 218 of the penal code,” said Phnom Penh Municipal Court deputy prosecutor Chea Math. The three charged were sent to Prey Sar prison pending further investigation, he said.

If convicted of intentional violence under Article 217 and 218 of the Penal Code of the Kingdom of Cambodia, the three accused could face a two to five year prison sentence and fines of up to 10 million riel (US$2,475).

A draft law on acid attacks will arrive at the council of ministers by the end of January, according to Ouk Kimleak, undersecretary of state at Ministry of Interior and deputy director of the acid law committee, who said that the law was behind schedule due to reviews by foreign countries and NGOs.

The Cambodian Acid Survivors Charity recorded a total of 19 attacks and 36 burn victims in 2010, CASC programme manager Chhun Sophea told The Post last week.

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