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Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Traffic crackdown ends

Traffic crackdown ends

POLICE have declared a monthlong crackdown on vehicles violating traffic laws a complete success.

On August 1, authorities across the Kingdom stepped up efforts to clamp down on illegal vehicles by confiscating cars and motorcycles that failed to comply with traffic laws. Previously, the owners of such vehicles faced nothing more than a fine.

This week, the confiscation campaign drew to a close and police returned to the original fining scheme.

Him Yan, deputy director of the Department of Public Order of the National Police Station, said: “We notice that our [confiscation] campaign has been very successful because nearly 90 percent of the population now understand and abide by the traffic laws. So we think it is time we started fining [again].”

“For motorbikes, we fine 3,000 riels [$0.72] for not having a helmet; 4,000 riels for not having side mirrors and 5,000 riels for overloading. For autos, we fine 5,000 riels for not wearing seatbelts,” he said.

He added that a fine would double if it was not paid within 30 days; triple if not paid within 60 days; and if it remained unpaid after 90 days, the offender would be sent to court.

For motorcycle traffic violations alone, police collect 3 million riels in fines per day, he said.

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